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Most people have never been taught how to conduct an executive job search, unless they have had the insight to work with an executive career coach. Research shows that the average executive spends 4 years in a job — and has as many as 12-15 jobs over the course of a career.
 
You may thrive on variety and change in your career. But no one likes to linger in the “unknown’ too long when making a transition to a new job or career direction. Here are some tips to help you work towards finding a new executive job faster.


"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas Edison

At the pace that technology and the global economy is moving, it is no wonder that we all have trouble keeping up. It may not be dressed in overalls but it is absolutely hard work. In the last 5-8 years, the way a job search is conducted has altered markedly, and professionals must continue to stay abreast of new styles, techniques and methodologies employed in a career transition. In some ways, our careers are now always “on” due to the Technology 4.0.

Searching for a role in the executive job market can be tricky to navigate no matter where you are in the job search. And with the rise of digitalization, tactics that you used 5 years ago may no longer be effective.

In this guide, you'll learn how to:

It is never too late to pursue a new career. As an Executive Resume Writer, I can attest that returning to school after years in the workforce with the intent of using your new graduate or undergraduate degree to make a change is quite common! With the last semester looming and graduation on the horizon or in the rear view mirror, many have a dream role in mind but struggle with how to position themselves, and their new degree, on LinkedIn.

When discussing cultural differences, we tend to think in terms of national culture. Culture, however, goes beyond nationality and is referred to as “the pattern of beliefs, behaviors, and values maintained by groups of interacting people.” (Milton J. Bennett, Ph.D). This implies that there are several types of culture: regional, gender, religion, professional, corporate and generational.

How will your executive job search strategy hold-up in today's highly-competitive environment?

Understanding the latest industry and regional trends, having a thorough knowledge of the executive recruitment process and gathering insider advice on how to build a job search strategy can give you a critical edge. This webinar will put your executive job search on the fast track by leveraging executive insights and better positioning yourself for upcoming opportunities.  

If it’s been longer than 5 years since you’ve dipped your toes in the job search waters, it’s important to understand that some key components of the job hunt have changed. As an Executive Resume Writer, I can attest that there’s more to it than refreshing your resume (even if you have your resume professionally written), making sure your LinkedIn is current (although that’s certainly an important part of it), and scouring online job boards.

In fact, spending most of your time applying online can land you in the ATS (applicant tracking system) black hole— from which many resumes never return. Not only will you walk away incredibly frustrated, it will likely prolong your job search.

Is your New Year’s resolution to land your next great executive-level job? Do you have a comprehensive written plan and strategy to ensure your successful results—one that does not rely exclusively on job postings? An effective job search in 2019 requires a nontraditional combination, multi-pronged strategy—proactive outreach both in-person and online.

First, remember connections continue to be the key in how the most sought-after executive positions are filled. The growth of social networking, online dissemination of personal information and increased workforce mobility have made the importance of building and maintaining professional connections critical.

You have probably heard most executive jobs are either found through networking or by being "headhunted" by executive-level recruitment firms, also called search firms. Both leveraging your network and building relationships with a few executive recruiters in your industry are methods that can be highly effective for winning new opportunities. Both are without a doubt critical for executive-level professionals to include in their overall career management strategy. Both, however, do take considerable time — the results don’t happen overnight.

The upside of a booming economy means hiring is stronger than ever. The downside? More folks are out there emboldened to test the job search waters. The bottom line? The job market is growing increasingly saturated, and as an executive (whether seeking an executive writer service or not), you must do a lot more in addition to speaking with a handful of recruiters to land interviews that are a good match for your skillset.

To get a foot in the door and boost the number of interviews that come along, executive job seekers must be ready to invest in some upfront sweat equity that, in reality, is not all that different from the strategies they employ to be successful in their roles.