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How tos on improving/updating/editing your resume
 

It may go without saying that having an internationally focused, branded bio, resume or CV and other career marketing materials is a must if you want to be seriously considered for jobs overseas or an international assignment.

But in an increasingly competitive and global marketplace, even if you are not looking to work abroad, having a more international profile can help you stand out and strengthen your application for many types of positions.

As an executive, you know the importance of distinguishing between activities that are strategically focused and those that are tactical in nature. Often, you develop and direct strategic plans while delegating the related tactical actions to your management team and those who report to them. Not surprisingly, a similar distinction applies to your executive resume.
 
What do I mean by that? To start with, your resume can be considered a strategic document overall, in the sense that it takes a long-range look at your career and is kept current in terms of job-market trends, your expanding business expertise, and other factors that have long-term implications.
 

The average recruiter only spends 6.25 seconds looking at a candidate's resume. When was the last time you edited or updated your executive resume? Was it keyword optimized and reader friendly?  

career outlook

 

Like the people who write them, all executive resumes are unique, but there are seven common pitfalls that are often made by those who write their own resumes. To improve your chances of success, and keep your resume out of the trash pile, here is a breakdown of what you need to look out for.

1. Not Optimizing Your Resume

Your employment situation can change in a heartbeat — the company may be acquired, or sold, or go out of business. A great boss may leave for a new position — and maybe he wants you to come with him/her. Or maybe his/her replacement wants to bring in his/her own people. Are you ready to jump at a new opportunity in an instant?

Even if you are not actively looking for a new position, your executive resume should be updated and ready to go at a moment’s notice.

Whether you call it a resume or a CV, this career document is an essential element in an executive job search and career management strategy. Because BlueSteps members come from all around the world, we at BlueSteps Executive Career Services have become accustomed to answering questions and providing feedback regarding members’ CVs. Here are a few of the most frequently asked questions.

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I’ve worked full-time as a executive resume/CV writer since 1981. I can’t even begin to calculate how many resumes/CVs I’ve written, but it’s in the thousands!

After 30 years, I know things about resume/CV writing that most job seekers don’t - I’m sure you can say the same about your profession. There are always "insider secrets" that only people who work in those professions know because that knowledge comes from years of experience. In this article, I’m going to share some of those things with you: resume/CV writing strategies and actions that you can use to strengthen your resume/CV and give yourself a competitive edge.

For many executives, especially those who have been in their current position for several years, the answer to this question is often out of memory.

But, with the rise of new executive searches in many sectors, according to recently released AESC data, now is the time to make sure your executive resume/CV is up-to-date and effectively written.

When working with executive search consultants, if a suitable opportunity arises, your resume will be immediately requested, leading to missed opportunities for those who are underprepared.

“Omit needless words,” wrote William Strunk Jr. in 1918’s timeless writing guide The Elements of Style. “A sentence should contain no unnecessary words…for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.”

That’s good advice, and a key element in making an effective executive resume for your job search. Resume language should be tight and concise because:

The key to an executive resume that gets results is writing one that is targeted toward the type of position you are seeking. But what if you have more than one position you are qualified for and interested in?
 
A sales/business development executive may be equally qualified for an executive role in Business Development or Product Management. Or an operations executive may want to target a General Manager role, while keeping the door open for a more specialized role in Supply Chain Management. An IT executive with an operations background may want to be considered for either a CIO or COO job.