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How tos on improving/updating/editing your resume
 

In today’s fast-paced job market, the average recruiter is only able to spend approximately 6.25 seconds looking at your resume. If your resume fails to make an impression in that time, you might be missing out on many executive career opportunities.

When was the last time you updated your executive resume? Is your resume keyword optimized?

Your resume is your professional story. At best, it is easy-to-skim, engaging, and provides the depth of information necessary to understand your value. A well-balanced mixture of contributions, achievements, and responsibilities, presented in the backdrop in which they were performed, can provide that depth of understanding.
 

Are you using the right tool for the job? As an executive resume and LinkedIn profile writer, a common misconception I come across in my work is the belief that a LinkedIn profile should be merely an online version of one’s resume.

If you want to stand out in today’s competitive job market, sometimes a good resume is not good enough. So, what makes a perfect resume? If you are not attracting the opportunities that you deserve, it might be time to change the bait and reassess the components of what is considered your most important career document. Below are our top recommendations for what makes a perfect executive resume. How does yours shape up?
 

perfect_executive_resumeIt gets an A+ for spelling and grammar.

For many executives, their resume/CV is something that has long since been forgotten, if they have one at all. But if you suddenly find yourself in need of what is considered your most important career document, rather than simply adding your latest positions or accomplishments to the bottom of an old, outdated resume, it might be worth checking these four vital signs to make sure that it’s fit for purpose.
 

executive_resume_er1. Check-up on the format.

BlueSteps is renowned for working with senior executives across the world, but once a year we are privileged to collaborate with the most globally recognized executive…more powerful than Bill Gates or Richard Branson…the jolly ole man in the big red suit…the Chief Excitement Officer around the world…Santa Claus!

You might not think Santa Claus is into career management but he’s a very smart and shrewd business leader. Every year, Santa schedules an annual resume review and coaching session with his BlueSteps coach. Santa Claus knows how important it is to stay current. When he first started his career, no one had heard of the Internet. Executives didn’t need an online presence. His target audience wasn’t connected and engaged in social media on a 24/7 basis.

With the holidays well underway, the season of excess is upon us. There are too many parties to go to and too many delicious things to tempt us. But as we all know, when it’s your third holiday gathering in one week and you are facing yet another table full of rich delights, you may begin to appreciate those heavy dishes less and long for a lighter meal.

Looking to give your executive resume, LinkedIn and career documents a boost? Here are a few quick tips to help.
 

As a BlueSteps executive resume writer, I spend a lot of time evaluating resumes and CVs and sharing insights regarding the ways in which my clients can improve their career literature—and to be honest, I see a lot of good resumes.

Most executives I work with have impressive achievements and strong selling points, such as MBAs from prestigious universities, fluency in multiple languages, and experience in leading some of the biggest names in global business. Sometimes this information alone will garner enough interest for them to be invited to an interview.

When trying to write your executive resume, you may find yourself lost in a forest of information. Most executives have decades of experience, sometimes spanning many fields and industries. How can you pour all that background into just a few 8 x 11 inch pages? Where do you even start?

To tackle this challenge, it helps to frame your experience and goals as a Venn diagram (see image below). Picture the left circle as every detail of your work experience, going all the way back to that pizza delivery job in high school. Then picture the right circle as every detail of your career goal. This includes your target job title, duties, industry, and company size.