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How to be seen by recruiters and what to do when they reach out initially 
 

A strong relationship with executive recruiters is a key part of an executive career management strategy, although for many catching their attention seems like a daunting task. But, there are a number of steps job seekers can take to greatly increase their chances of success. In this two-part series, I will share the most effective ways I have come to learn as a professional career advisor and executive search consultant. Here in part one, I focus on 8 tips to catch a recruiter’s attention via your email, cover letter, and resume. executive recruiters

 

#1: Match Job Criteria 

When seeking an executive role, relying on a single executive job search strategy–such as job ads–is akin to trying to get in shape merely by doing some sit-ups. Learn the executive job search equivalent of a full-body workout to maximize results. 

 

If you’re like me, summer vacation is long over, but you are still carrying around its remnants in the form of extra pounds. Returning to the gym after beach snoozing—stirring only for ice cream or Piña Coladas—can be brutal.

It’s easy to get discouraged when conducting an executive job search. As a lower-level manager or professional, perhaps it seemed that job opportunities abounded. But now, at the executive level, the available positions are harder to come by and it can be difficult to be privy to information about vacancies.

As a candidate in the middle of the hiring process with an executive search firm and their client, it can be frustrating to be unaware of what’s going on “behind the curtain.” This article provides an overview of how the search process works from the client perspective. During all stages of the process, make sure you’re answering all questions honestly, including questions about compensation. Also, do not get in touch directly with the client unless instructed to by the search professional. As the gatekeeper and decision maker for the client, it’s the search professional’s job to deal with candidates directly.
 

1. Launch meeting with the search firm

So you've gotten a call from an executive search professional...what's next? Watch this video for a quick overview and read below for more details about each step you should take during the call.
 

You didn’t reach the senior management/executive ranks by being lazy. More than likely, you worked quite hard to get where you are today. That said, it might seem strange that I refer to in-person networking and lazy job searching as opposites; but there is a reason.

No, this is not one more entry in the seemingly unending stream of articles that browbeat you for not networking or not doing it as often or as well as you should. However, I do want to share a few thoughts you might not have previously considered about in-person networking and its role in your next job search.

You’ve probably heard this comparison before: A job search is in essence a marketing campaign with you as the product. Your career communications tools are your marketing collateral, and your executive job search strategy equates to your marketing campaign. A smart campaign hones in on specific targets with specific marketing messages built around a specific career brand aligned with specific proof points.
 

Any job search can contain unexpected hazards—it more or less goes with the territory. However, if you’re a currently-employed executive planning a confidential job search, the potential perils ahead of you give a whole new meaning to the concept of risk.

executive_job_search_confidentialThe view from the executive ranks can be exciting and invigorating; however, at that level even a small misstep might have disastrous consequences. Premature or unplanned communication of your intent to secure a new position is certainly a misstep you want to avoid—and not a small one.

The speed of technological growth has changed our lives significantly. Explore some of the technology trends that will inform the next decade of business leadership and question how to strike a balance between the art and science of strategic advising.  

Companies must have a compelling hiring need to pay the fees of executive search consultants. Otherwise, they would do the search themselves through their network, LinkedIn or hiring boards. Many companies even start by looking at their own networks before hiring an executive recruiter. Here are the reasons why companies look to executive recruiters.