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Advancing to a different level in your career. Learn about skills you need to move up to a specific level (usually referring to the C-Suite) or how to plan and prepare for moving up to a higher position.
 
When in the presence of someone who has achieved success in business, it is natural to question: What is he or she doing differently than the rest of us?
 
Many people conclude that highly successful people are those who are blessed with higher intellect, more charisma, or simply luck. However, this is usually not the case. Recent accounts by business leaders suggest that the strongest factor tying successful people together is simple: their ability to be self-aware.
 

At one time, capable executives could reasonably expect to build and maintain a healthy career without having particularly strong expertise in technology. (Unless, of course, they wanted to be successful CTOs or CIOs!) Not anymore. The advent and explosive growth of the digital age has transformed the game, probably forever.
 
I was going to use the decline of the buggy whip industry as an illustration here, but online research showed me that this analogy is a bit off base. For example, one article indicated that companies that survived the emergence of the automotive industry most successfully were those able to adapt their technology for use with automobiles. Presumably, their executives saw a path that would position their companies for survival—and took it.

Venture capitalists (VCs) are paying more attention to the structure of the marketing teams they invest in and when hiring for CMO jobs. Why? Because marketing plays an increasingly influential role in the success of their portfolio companies.  To ensure that the marketing department can generate the kind of leads that drive sales, they want to see a particular profile in a marketing executives.

Get Your Career Momentum Going
Thursday, September 13th 2012, 12:00PM - 1:00PM US ET


Join us for a complimentary seminar presented by the McQuaig Institute and BlueSteps Executive Careers Services. We will be discussing:
  • How self-awareness can lead to greater personal and professional effectiveness
  • How knowing your "natural temperament" will assist you in making better career decisions
  • And much more...
As an expert in business education, I’m sure you must get this question all the time, but for those considering an EMBA or MBA program, it’s a question they inevitably will ask—is an MBA or an EMBA worth it—what are the benefits of having the degree today?
Asking questions is hard, especially when it comes to starting a new job search, looking for the next step in your career, or during an interview—are you selling yourself in the right way?

So often we underestimate our skills and struggle to answer the right question when the time comes. The important thing to do is take a step back, consider your responses and ask for clarification. When in conversation it is easy to get distracted by questions and then provide an answer that is not suitable or off topic. It’s important to understand what the question actually is, so don’t be afraid to ask for clarification and don’t rush, that way you can provide the right answer.

With an immediate family member passing through a very emotionally demanding chronic condition (persistent vegetative state: PVS. i.e., no evidence of self-awareness or interaction) that actually resulted from an acute event (stroke), I began to explore further on those two topics.
 
I gather that while acute illness, like influenza, a cut wound, etc., may be painful over a brief period, from which one may recover sooner with proper remedial steps, chronic diseases, however, are persistent—even lasting a lifetime—such as kidney trouble or diabetes.

Though both are abhorred, could one of them (acute or chronic) be easier to manage than the other?

The entrepreneurial skills gained in start-up ventures are second to none when it comes to seeking a high executive-level position. Whether or not you have ever begun your own business, these following skills are vital at all levels of an organization and can determine the speed in which you climb to the highest positions.

There is the adage that the average person will change careers several times in his or her lifetime. Depending on where you get your information, the actual number of changes fluctuates between as little as three and as many as ten, but the message is the same, people do change industries and they do it successfully. Here are three important steps to take when planning and executing a career transition:

Evaluate

In their new book, You Need a Leader - Now What?, James M. Citrin and Julie Hembrock Daum present key skills that hiring organizations need in order to fill leadership positions. Based on decades of experience at AESC member search firm Spencer Stuart, Citrin and Daum offer valuable advice to help organizations assess the benefits of experience versus potential, and also talent from within versus talent from outside, in choosing leaders, all within the context of critical pressures such as technology, diversity, and economic forces.