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Advancing to a different level in your career. Learn about skills you need to move up to a specific level (usually referring to the C-Suite) or how to plan and prepare for moving up to a higher position.
 

As your career has advanced, so has your skill set and confidence. You now execute countless activities with precision. Create a five year business plan to grow revenue? No problem! Tabulate and document a financial plan to present to investors and the board? Done in 48 hours! Form the marketing plan to launch a new product in a new channel? Piece of cake! Envision and map a career plan for yourself supported with targeted marketing material? That might take a while.

There are endless reasons why executives turn to a career management service such as BlueSteps.

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While the jury is still out on whether marriages are really made in heaven, as far as corporate marriages go, the moot question is whether has one has really tied the knot or tied oneself up in knots! In this context, the quest to find the right company is the one which comes closest to the eternal quest for many folks in the corporate world today, given the sheer number of companies one works for over one’s career span, answering that most innocuous of questions, “Why did you leave your last company and why do you want to work for us?” several times over. Here’s a selection of variables that invariably go into this decision-making process, based on my own experience and those of many others.

As the job market fluctuates, more executives are venturing out of the safe harbor of their current companies to look for new opportunities. Many have been biding their time for months, if not years. During an economic crisis, many are willing to tolerate negative, demoralizing or unchallenging situations at their employment for financial security.

I just don’t have the time.

We all say it, or at least think it, every day. We have to make some hard decisions on how we use our available time. We have to prioritize.

Our jobs and careers demand that we set priorities, too. I hear it every day from friends and colleagues – especially when they try to explain why they aren’t more involved with their industry associations.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive-level productivity, featuring Andrew Kris, from Borderless, and Chris Swan, from TRANSEARCH.

Some of the questions asked included:

Stress is one of the most pervasive afflictions in the corporate sector today. The harm it can inflict is compounded by the fact that it is amorphous by nature, thereby preventing us from measuring it or even being aware of the extent to which it affects us. While there are reams of advice on the topic, I will attempt to summarize a few approaches for managing stress from my real-life experiences as a senior-level executive.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive performance reviews, featuring John Ryan, from TRANSEARCH.

Some of the questions asked included:

Early in my first career (in television), I worked with someone who excelled at telling me (and probably many others) that my work was “not right.” Yet, when I asked what was wrong, the person couldn’t tell me.

manager_communication“What’s wrong with it,” I asked.

“It’s not what I expected.”

“But it’s exactly what was outlined in the brief and the storyboard.”

“But it’s not right.”

“In what way?”

“It came out different.”

“Different how?”

“Not the same as I wanted.”

“What did you want?”

“Not this.”

“Well, then, what would you change to make it what you want?”

If you’re a department head, vice president or director, now is a great time to start planning a move up to the C-suite in the coming year. Because you will need to reach out to your network, polish your resume, talk with executive recruiters and begin the extended interview process, making a change won’t happen overnight.

Here are seven steps that can help set you apart from the competition.
 

c_suite_executive_job_search1. Leverage social media.

As a Director or VP, one of the key questions you need to ask yourself is, do I really have a passion to advance to a C-level executive position? You cannot allow yourself to be purely driven by money or status, but rather ask the question, “Will I be happy, and fulfilled, in reaching the C-suite?” From the time we start our careers, we all naturally want to be at the top of the heap, but unfortunately, for many, achieving this objective results in a material decrease in job satisfaction.