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Advancing to a different level in your career. Learn about skills you need to move up to a specific level (usually referring to the C-Suite) or how to plan and prepare for moving up to a higher position.
 

In order to better position yourself for new opportunities in 2018, it is vital for executive candidates to have a highly-optimized and proactive career strategy. To achieve success, executives must be able to leverage executive search and industry trends, project a unique personal brand and utilize their professional networks.

This webinar recording has an expert panel who provide essential advice and insider knowledge to help you advance your career this year.  

It is often the case that those who seek out executive career guidance do so because of a significant or imminent event in their career, such as an unexpected period of transition or an upcoming interview. But in reality, no matter where you are in your career, executive career guidance can have a dramatic impact on your career trajectory.

As professionals age, each individual is accountable to apply their intellect to mitigate the risks associated with ageism. Since the last publication, Warren Buffett, at his annual shareholders meeting noted that one of his top executives is 92, and still running one of his largest business units. This statement speaks for itself.

Top achievers in all fields rely on coaches to help them achieve maximum levels of performance. As an executive, you can benefit from working with a coach during several critical phases of your career:

How has technology changed the assessment of candidates and what opportunities do these innovations create? 

The dramatic rise of technology over the last decade has equipped executive search and leadership consulting firms to serve their clients in new and increasingly transformative ways – fusing new tools and techniques with the traditional foundations of the profession. It’s not too long ago that an executive search consultant’s little black book was their biggest asset. But the technological developments of the last decade have codified what executive search consultants have always known about leadership into useful identification and assessment tools.

During my everyday conversations with clients and candidates, one topic often tops the discussion agenda: The progression of a career and how it can evolve. At times, when you critically analyze your career, you find that your career just happened. My experience as a search consultant has shown me that many people don’t plan their career progression because they believe there are too many factors that will make it too hard to plan their career paths.

But, this is not actually the case for successful people. Many successful people identify their core goals and plan the actionable steps to help them achieve those goals.

Ask many people in corporate America their Myers Briggs type and most likely they will be able to tell you their four-letter code, along with their astrological sign. Thanks to team building, and management skills training, we can describe ourselves with personality test terms such as Driver or Amiable as well.

History is littered with the hulls of rudderless ships because the appropriate captain was not at the helm; and carcasses of executives who have spent lavishly at shareowner expense or inappropriately spoke a word in haste and waste. This year has seen its fair share of jettisoned executives for everything from moral turpitude and fiscal excess or simply being there in the wrong slot. The spectrum of personalities and rationales for the revolving door varies widely. Whether one is able to bounce back often is based on the nature and severity of the departure and whether it was self-inflicted or politically induced.

The number of qualified executive candidates searching for new positions creates a highly competitive job market. Employers are more selective with their executive hires today than ever before.

How can you present yourself to be more hireable and beat your competition? The following four strategies are key.
 

1: Stand out with your resume.

Although I research and teach about emotions, I also have clients, colleagues, and a family (including two cats, two dogs a husband, and an almost four-year-old), so I can very well understand why we all struggle sometimes. This afternoon, my son has been in the house for 15 minutes, has spilled water all over the kitchen floor and then walked in it with his dirty feet from outside, screamed (happily) about 100 times (or so it seems) while playing with one of the dogs, whined about having his nails cut and has been singing in between it all. Now, don’t get me wrong, I am very grateful to be able to work from home some of the time and have him come by for a hug once in a while and to just be here in the midst of the craziness of life.