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Advice and tips on how to improve, update, edit your linkedin profile and making it more visible to recruiters and those in your network.
 

Are you using the right tool for the job? As an executive resume and LinkedIn profile writer, a common misconception I come across in my work is the belief that a LinkedIn profile should be merely an online version of one’s resume.

Most people know how important SEO (search engine optimization) is for driving traffic to websites, but many executive job seekers don’t realize that these same principles apply to their LinkedIn profiles. Without strong SEO, all of the time and effort you spend on LinkedIn in the hopes of advancing your executive career search may be in vain.

Below are some quick tips on how you can increase the visibility of your online profile and optimize it for LinkedIn’s search algorithm.
 

1. Make sure your public profile is visible.

Many executives are at a loss when it comes to networking on social media, particularly if they are relatively new to it, or if they are simply more comfortable with face-to-face interactions.

executive_networkingIt’s important to remember that social media networking is still networking—the essence doesn’t change just because it takes place online.

So let’s review what networking is (according to the Random House Learner’s Dictionary of American English):

“The informal sharing of information and services among individuals or groups that have a common interest”

There is simply nothing more useful than an authentic and from-the-heart endorsement or richly rewarded recommendation on LinkedIn, the world’s de facto connection utility. With a membership at some 400 million people, LinkedIn clearly is the platform of choice for business networking.

In today’s parlance you might characterize third party citations as earned endorsements or righteous recommendations. But the issue often is how do I get folks to write one for me without sacrificing authenticity or being too self-serving? And what is better, a full “recommendation” written by a co-worker, former boss or a quick “skills endorsement” notation by friend, family or colleague?

I get a lot of questions about using LinkedIn. For some of them, the answer is obvious. Should you put up a profile picture? Yes, of course. Some questions, however, have no definite answer.

Bear with me, as I try to explain some of the tricky situations you might encounter while using LinkedIn:
 

Is it a good idea to accept all invitations to connect on LinkedIn? If not, what criteria should be followed?

LinkedIn is business networking on steroids. Imagine going to a conference and receiving fifty business cards in 10 minutes, that’s how crazy it can get. But like typical networking events, some of the LinkedIn invites you receive will be of no interest to you.

Don’t accept all invites you get. Connect with a purpose.

When launching your executive job search campaign while employed, there are always a few concerns. The biggest concern is that your current employer might find out. Some consider this “disloyal” behavior, even if they themselves would have no issue with poaching an executive from a competitor.

A few companies have internal or unwritten policies that an employee (executive or otherwise) who is discovered searching for a new job should be replaced as soon as possible, rather than be stuck having to quickly fill a key position when that person gives notice. For this reason, if your job search is discovered, the company may start to seek your replacement, even if you haven’t announced you’re looking, much less leaving.

Keywords are the driving force behind HR and executive recruiter searches, and thus they are critical to developing an effective and highly productive LinkedIn Profile. The competitive nature of the employment environment makes it essential for you to set yourself apart from the competition. On LinkedIn, the number of keyword hits you receive will affect how your profile is ranked during recruiting searches.

 

LinkedIn gives you the unique ability to connect with millions of professionals and executive search recruiters within your industry. If you're not being found, this webinar can hold the answers to your career success. Moreover, as LinkedIn is so highly ranked by search engines, if your name is searched by a potential employer, it is likely to be their first impression of you. What does your profile say about you?  

LinkedIn has now made vast improvements to its increasingly popular Who’s Viewed Your Profile feature, helping users analyze their results and work towards increasing their visibility in specific areas and industries. LinkedIn has reported that nearly 80% of job candidates are found through networking today, so there has never been a better time to start building your own network!
 
Main Changes and How to Utilize Them:
 
1. What industries is my profile being viewed from?

LinkedIn is growing in APAC
 
LinkedIn now has more than 50 million users in the Asia Pacific region, and counting. Last year alone, LinkedIn gained over 7 million new users in India, and over 2 million in Australia and New Zealand. This growth is apparent across the whole region, with nine Asia Pacific countries now boasting more than a million members each: India (24+ million), Australia (5+ million), China (4+ million), Indonesia and the Philippines (2+ million each), Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and New Zealand (1+ million each).