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How tos on improving/updating/editing your CV 
 

Executives can more effectively position themselves for new opportunities, and dramatically decrease time spent in-transition by ensuring that their three vital career documents are fully optimized and up-to-date. Executive resumes, LinkedIn profiles and cover letters form the cornerstone of any job search or career progression, so time should be invested in them to ensure your results are maximized.
 

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If you’ve ever tried to loosen a flathead screw with a Phillips screwdriver, you know how frustrating and difficult it can be to get the result you’re after. The Phillips is simply not made for the job you want it to do. The same goes for trying to empty a swimming pool by scooping out a bucketful of water at a time. Using the wrong tool for the job can fall anywhere between impossible and unnecessarily hard.
 
What does this have to do with executive resumes or CVs? To start with, if you’re thinking that a one-size-fits-all approach to your resume will serve you well in all cases, you’re on the wrong track. In some situations, a specially developed resume—or even no resume at all—might be the right tool for the job.

When it comes to writing a resume, I see many candidates struggle with deciding how far back to go, what to include, and what not to include as part of your career history. As an executive resume writer, I’m an advocate of devoting the majority of the “real estate” on your resume to what happened in the past 15 years.

In this article, I’ll present the case for and against this stance, discuss some workarounds that might work for everyone, and throw in my two cents on what to include on LinkedIn.

 

As an Executive Resume Writer, I frequently have clients tell me they don’t want to limit themselves. Therefore, they ask for a resume that can be used for a variety of roles; they are looking for a way to transform their resume. Unfortunately, generic resumes often are quite diluted. Therefore, the reader is hard-pressed to determine how you are a good fit for a specific role.

It is great to be a jack-of-all-trades – but it is rare that a job posting calls for someone with these skills. Customizing your resume in a few key areas requires a bit of work. However, it will guide the reader to see how your skills align with a job posting.

As the adage goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. Make sure your resume/CV, executive bio and other career documents are making the right impression by properly highlighting your executive value proposition, experience and personal brand.

This guide will cover:

At the initial stage in the recruitment process, your resume/CV is likely to be assessed in 10 seconds or less. Does your resume/CV have what it takes to grab their attention in that time frame?

If your resume is not strategically written, keyword optimized, or written in a concise manner, you could be missing out on new opportunities. In this recording, our panel will discuss what they look for in a winning resume/CV and their best strategies to dramatically improve your resume's performance to secure that interview.  

The higher you climb in your career, the more competitive it becomes. So, in a crowded executive job market, how will your resume set you apart, showcase your value and get you through to the next stage of candidacy?

While some executive trends remind consistent over the years, there are some immerging resume trends that top candidates need to be aware of before submitting their career documents.

If you are an executive job seeker or looking to boost your personal brand, here are 10 resume tips to keep in mind for 2019:

Is your 2019 New Year’s Resolution to find a new and challenging executive role? If so, you will need to make sure your search strategy is effective, your resume meets best practices, and your LinkedIn presence conveys the appropriate message to your intended community.

Often, resumes will try to cover too many job targets on one document. It confuses recruiters who will quickly lose their interest. If you don’t write to a specific target audience, your resume won’t connect recruiters to the job they are trying to fill. A modern resume is a well-branded resume. The first and most important step is to define your brand and key differentiators.

Is it time to pivot out of the functional area or industry you’ve been working within?

There is no doubt that expanding your horizons in terms of functional expertise or industry can amplify your career prospects and make you a more attractive hire for the broader perspective you’ll bring. But getting over the first hurdle of convincing a recruiter to consider you can be challenging.

It’s no surprise—it can even be challenging to develop a compelling career story when you are not making a major transition. Throw in the need to completely reposition yourself, and the task can quickly become overwhelming.

Here are a few tips to consider as you craft your career documents to reposition yourself for a new area or sector.

Recent U.K. employment figures show, despite economy uncertainties, wages are still rapidly growing and unemployment rates are almost at their lowest levels in 44 years. These conditions allow for a strong job market for leadership-level job seekers looking to advance their careers, with hiring organizations and executive recruiters having to vie for candidates.