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A chief human resources officer or CHRO is a company’s top executive in charge of the management of human resources. The CHRO is also in charge of developing and creating strategies in that field.

Industry 4.0 has now given way to “Business 4.0,” the current global business environment generated by the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Business 4.0 extends beyond the industrial sector to encompass all sectors, from financial and professional services to health care and consumer goods. So great is its influence, Business 4.0 is reshaping the roles that make up the executive ranks within organizations around the world.

It’s often said that when it comes to knowing about technology, there are just two different types of HRD: those that know their stuff, and those that do not.

This is an excerpt of AESC's report Leading Transformation: Shaping the C-Suite for Business. In the excerpt, AESC member executive recruiters how they believe the C-level leaders will need to evolve to compete in Business 4.0.

 
Must some C-Suite roles change more dramatically than others to meet the demands of Business 4.0? “All C-Suite functions are impacted in one way or another,” commented a consultant based in the UK. “No one function is exempt.”
 

CEOs Must Drive the Culture Change

As a hiring manager or talent acquisition consultant, losing a candidate to a counteroffer is a killer. Picture this…

It’s remarkable to think that in a few short years we have come so far, technically speaking. In the early days, recruiting was done using tools the youth of today might scoff at. Hard copies of management files and candidates that were filed alphabetically in folders were the norm. If you wanted information on a candidate, you just accessed the file in the cabinet in the corner of the office. Now, modern technology has allowed us to access a global workforce at the click of a button.

What does it take to become a successful Human Resources Executive? Did most of the top HR executives attain higher education beyond a Bachelor's Degree? How long did it take most of these executives to reach the senior level? How many companies did most senior-level executives work for before reaching the senior level?

At times, HR executives can encounter a difficult path on their journey to the C-suite. The following strategies can be useful for HR executives who are interested in becoming a key part of their companies’ strategic organization.
 
1. Start with the Basics. Most executives know that the best way to move up in their career is to excel at their current position. By mastering the basics, such as contract negotiation strategies, an HR executive can quickly get noticed and move up the corporate ladder.

Complex and fast-paced changes have fundamentally altered the face of business during the past decade. Simultaneous shifts in the environmental, regulatory, sustainability, social and geopolitical dimensions have transformed management and placed exceptional demands on leaders.

If, as a consequence, human and leadership capital are an unprecedented source of competitive advantage for organizations, what could be the implications for the CHRO?

HR executive searches have been in high demand by organizations worldwide. Boyden’s Leadership Series recently interviewed Catherine Gray, Principal of Boyden Chicago, to discuss the current hiring trends for Chief Human Resources Officers (CHROs) and what qualities are most sought after by top executive search firms hiring CHROs. The full interview, and a feature on Dean Carter, Chief Human Resources Officer of Sears Holdings, is available at www.boyden.com.