Executive Career Management

What do you want to accomplish professionally in 2014? Have you asked yourself this question recently? Many executives are just too wrapped up in the day-to-day of their jobs to take a pulse reading of where they are in their own career management strategy.  As an executive, you know that being proactive is a must in this fast-paced world.
If you answer yes to the following statements, then you may need a career direction evaluation:
  • Your job lacks challenge and excitement for you.
  • You are feeling unappreciated.

What does it take to become a successful Human Resources Executive? Did most of the top HR executives attain higher education beyond a Bachelor's Degree? How long did it take most of these executives to reach the senior level? How many companies did most senior-level executives work for before reaching the senior level?

Michael Phelps is built for swimming. With an extended torso, giving him increased upper body strength, shorter legs for more effective kicking, an arm-span disproportionately large for his height, giving him more arm muscle and bigger hands for pushing water, and greater ankle flexibility for propulsion, his body is naturally suited to being an athletic swimmer.

The small factors that differentiate us all, both physically and mentally, can have a profound effect on our career success. Identifying and utilizing our personal traits, for our career, is key to successfully being able to leverage ourselves for new opportunities.

Investment in your executive career is not an option if you want results. As an executive, you know that it often times takes going the extra mile to get the job done and reach a goal. Your mindset should be engaged to apply some of those same management strategies and tactics with your executive job search.
1. Big picture thinking. Most executives have the ability to focus on the big picture and not get bogged down with little details (they delegate those pieces). In your career management plan, focus on what is going well, what isn’t working, and change your plan accordingly.

When in the presence of someone who has achieved success in business, it is natural to question: What is he or she doing differently than the rest of us?
Many people conclude that highly successful people are those who are blessed with higher intellect, more charisma, or simply luck. However, this is usually not the case. Recent accounts by business leaders suggest that the strongest factor tying successful people together is simple: their ability to be self-aware.

At times, HR executives can encounter a difficult path on their journey to the C-suite. The following strategies can be useful for HR executives who are interested in becoming a key part of their companies’ strategic organization.
1. Start with the Basics. Most executives know that the best way to move up in their career is to excel at their current position. By mastering the basics, such as contract negotiation strategies, an HR executive can quickly get noticed and move up the corporate ladder.

Earlier today, BlueSteps hosted the #ExecCareer TweetChat featuring our expert BlueSteps Executive Career Services (BECS) panelists. Our expert career panelists, Barbara Safani and Stephen Van Vreede, provided very informative and useful answers for all in attendance.
If you missed it, catch up on all the excellent advice that was given in the Storyfy transcript below. Topics covered included:

Very few of us have the luxury of sitting back and letting the world come to us especially when it comes to maintaining an executive presence. Maintaining and raising your executive profile is an exercise in continuous improvement and one that pays dividends in a competitive executive job market. 
Here are a number of ways that you can stay relevant and active even when you’re not conducting an executive job search:

Exceptional findings from a recent BlueSteps survey reveal that senior-level marketing executives are concerned about the impact new technologies have on the role of the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO). The survey demonstrated that many executives (68%) believe that their marketing teams are not equipped to handle the fast-paced changes in digital marketing; and as a result, those executives who learn how to adapt will be best positioned for new executive opportunities.