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Being referred to a hiring manager by a trusted person increases an applicant’s odds of being hired 50–100X, according to Lou Adler, author of Performance-Based Hiring.
 
With odds like that, any job seeker would be foolish to ignore the power of networking. In fact, for an effective and efficient search, networking should be your primary strategy.
 
Not all executives believe this, however. I’ve heard lines like these countless times in my many years as a resume writer/career advisor:

With the rise of social media and easy publishing tools, 2015 is going to be the year of self-promotion through thought leadership. What does this mean for your career management strategy? It means that candidates who are looking to stand out will need to go beyond their personal brand to demonstrate their specific industry or functional area expertise.

This post will highlight the emerging trends you can join in on next year to showcase your thought leadership expertise out to your intended audience (executive recruiters and hiring managers). These include writing effective content, keyword optimization, publishing your content and tools to help expand your network.

My previous post discussed the C-suite Relationship Map, which I have based on the CFO Relationship Map I use in my executive coaching with Chief Financial Officers.  I have been working with this relationship map for the past few years.

I am fortunate to speak with hundreds of executives each year, in addition to those that I follow and track. Over the years, I have learned a lot about success, what works and what doesn’t, from these talented leaders.

One area that successful executives have in common is their ability to get the best out of their corporate relationships. No matter the discipline of the C-suite executive, their technical ability is just the base upon which they start having an impact on their organization. The CXO is not an island, but is integrated into an ecosystem that is mutually dependent. The success of any executive relies on others. Those who recognize, nurture and sustain successful corporate relationships are those that accomplish more.

When asked how they intend to find their next job, many executives answer, “I’ll contact a headhunter who can manage that for me.” Unfortunately, that statement reflects lack of knowledge about how executive recruiters work and the role an executive search firm plays in the careers of individual executives.
 

Now that you’ve climbed the ladder, how do you keep moving up?

Even experienced, successful executives need to ensure that they are always looking forward to the future. Being successful in the past is no guarantee of your future success. Effective career management is still necessary even at the top of the ladder.

When I look back on the hundreds of women I have coached individually and in groups, some key behaviors or workplace issues repeatedly come up for discussion. They are not exclusive to women, men have them too, but issues around these behaviors tend to manifest more strongly in women and can impede career growth or create roadblocks when not acted on. Working on improving behaviors that are holding y back can not only change your outlook on life, but will also accelerate your career management strategy.

Use Money as a Tool for Advancement

According to Peter Felix, AESC & BlueSteps President, "Senior executives are clearly working out how to balance the extreme demands that globalization and 24/7 accessibility can make upon them. Technology, while creating this accessibility, has also provided a form of liberation from the traditional work place environments and the constraints on personal freedom that they can create.

executive_career_coachingProfessional athletes have long known the secret to success is hiring a coach. Take any sport—tennis, football, boxing, even the Olympic athletes—and behind every one of them, especially the high achievers, you will find a coach mentoring and supporting that athlete.
 

A friend recommended this article to me recently that talked about how office workers in China are literally working themselves to death. Working on Wall Street can certainly feel that way in many ways (the highest highs come with the lowest lows), and with the news that a 21-year old intern working for Bank of America (BofA) collapsed and died last year after he worked until 6 am for three straight days (he also suffered from epilepsy, according the CNBC article), banks put forth explicit guidelines limiting the number of hours interns, and now first-year investment banking analysts, can work.