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Actively manage your career even when you're not actively looking. Learn about things you can and should doo between job searches to prepare to reach new career targets and build the skills and achievements you need to succeed and move up the career ladder.

Many executives think the professional promotion they put online will jeopardize their employment with their current company. They don’t want their employer to think they are actively looking for a job. Thus, they deliberately withhold information on LinkedIn (and other social sites), refuse to get recommendations and expand their social networks with new contacts.

Any career transition requires making your professional competencies visible online, as that’s where search firms and employers look. Though there is no avoiding visibility, you can approach it without risk by blogging in any language. Making a career transition can take the most advantage of a blog with least risk of your employer’s retribution.
 

Know Your Audience

In any communication medium, the #1 rule is: Know your audience! If you know little or nothing about the people who will be receiving your message, you are, in all likelihood, wasting your time by trying to deliver it. What is known as the shotgun approach does not work. At best, it means your unfocused or misdirected message might reach a few of the people you wanted to reach; at worst, it makes you look like a poor communicator.

During my everyday conversations with clients and candidates, one topic often tops the discussion agenda: The progression of a career and how it can evolve. At times, when you critically analyze your career, you find that your career just happened. My experience as a search consultant has shown me that many people don’t plan their career progression because they believe there are too many factors that will make it too hard to plan their career paths.

But, this is not actually the case for successful people. Many successful people identify their core goals and plan the actionable steps to help them achieve those goals.

I am a domino. It’s likely that you are, too. But whether you’re propped at the front of the line, in the middle, or way at the back will depend upon your current employment.

It is, as the pundits like to say, the price of progress: as technology advances, work changes and, often, that work goes away. It’s happened in manufacturing as robots replaced human workers (though offshoring didn’t help), and it’s moving on to white collar jobs where artificial intelligence is assuming chores that once were considered “safe for human assumption.”
 

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive career coaching, featuring Adriana Prates, Dasein Executive Search, Lucie Shaw, Amrop UK, and Lisa Thompson, Pearson Partners International.

Some of the questions asked included:

Have you mastered the art of telling concise, meaningful, high-impact stories in all of your career marketing communications?
 
Just as it can be a challenge to be objective about yourself and your career, it is equally difficult to “self-edit” the information you share with others during critical career transitions. It can all seem important because you’re so close to it. And you don’t want to omit something that might possibly be relevant, so the tendency is to share everything and trust your readers/listeners to sort out the gold.
 

Ask many people in corporate America their Myers Briggs type and most likely they will be able to tell you their four-letter code, along with their astrological sign. Thanks to team building, and management skills training, we can describe ourselves with personality test terms such as Driver or Amiable as well.

In order to attain a successful executive career, one must be prepared for change. In turbulent times, the need for executives to know how to effectively manage their careers - whether actively seeking employment or not - becomes critical.  

BlueSteps chats with Lene Berge, BlueSteps Career Advisor, who recently published Uncover. Position. Thrive: Your Guide to Job Search and Career Growth.

lene_berge_career_management_book_authorFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to speak with BlueSteps about career management and your new book. Can you tell us a little about your background?

As companies become more global, international careers increase. Now is an excellent time for those who want to take advantage of these international opportunities – and the following guidelines will help.
 
IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES

First, Know Thyself
Knowing who you are is the first step in understanding your international career choices. The answer to your next best job lies within you. Your vision and dreams, career passion and purpose, values and beliefs, strengths and weaknesses, determine your performance today and in the future.
 
Second, Know What You Want