Home

1 (800) 363-1207

Executive Career Management

As a Director or VP, one of the key questions you need to ask yourself is, do I really have a passion to advance to a C-level executive position? You cannot allow yourself to be purely driven by money or status, but rather ask the question, “Will I be happy, and fulfilled, in reaching the C-suite?” From the time we start our careers, we all naturally want to be at the top of the heap, but unfortunately, for many, achieving this objective results in a material decrease in job satisfaction.

Research surrounding the executive career management industry is extensive and the statistics available provide a resource paramount to the success of any senior executive career. These numbers warrant your attention.  You do not need to be a chief financial officer, mathematician or statistician to establish the relevance of results obtained from a wide range of resources - most importantly from decision makers - so do the math because your career depends on it.

At the end of the year, we often reflect on our goals for the New Year and beyond. As you think about your career goals, you may consider focusing on incorporating something you're passionate about.

Know Your Passion
It probably will not surprise you to know that the majority of people are not passionate about their work. In the United States, 77% have no job passion (Deloitte LLP, 2010); in Japan the number is 60% (The CONNECTYOU Report, 2009).
 

As the world increasingly becomes digitized, a lot of professionals suddenly find themselves short on relevance in various areas of work and life. While a natural reaction is to think that one has missed the bus, nothing could be farther from the truth. Here are eight ways to get out of the rut, based on actual feedback from surveys and consensus amongst industry observers:

Someone once said it was great to talk about maintaining work-life balance but you had to create that balance before you could maintain it. The same holds true for career management strategy and your executive career. You need to develop a strategy before you can execute it, and you can’t re-think it if you don’t have one to start with.
 
Interestingly, the concept of work-life balance shows up in Wikipedia’s definition of career management: “The outcome of successful career management should include personal fulfillment, work/life balance, goal achievement and financial security.”

For more on this topic, register for the "Career Transition Planning: Finding Your Next Opportunity" webinar.
 

As an executive, career planning is critical to your professional success, and a vital step for anyone seeking to expand their options, regardless of whether they intend to make a career move now or in the future. Planning your career transition in advance gives you the opportunity to understand and analyze a full range of options and adequately prepare ahead of time.

If you are a seasoned executive in today’s job queue, you are no doubt being sensitized to the quandary of age discrimination. From the lunch lady in Springfield, Illinois to the CEO of a men’s haberdashery, companies are betting on youth to preserve their vitality and inject new blood to ramp up their corporate circulation. A recent Google web search on “Age Discrimination” yielded 15.5 million results while the news category alone showed 753,000 hits. I suspect that the topic will continue to be one of great concern and importance as Baby Boomers, (those born between 1945 and 1964) and Gen X’ers (born between 1960 and 1980,) come face to face with their mortality and the trend to jettison old cargo.

Businesses are crying out for great leaders causing organisations to commit significant resources to leadership development. While much is said about the effectiveness of leadership development, the question is how effective is leadership development when it does not start as a practice early in a person’s career? 

Today’s challenging business times require extraordinary leadership, and increasingly companies across the globe are heavily invested in finding and empowering leaders. They compete for the best people outside of the organisation and also realise that their strength lies in a well-developed talent pool. Yet, they still fall behind in truly building the leadership capacity they need for the future.

Are you looking for a practically foolproof executive job search strategy? What would you say if I told you there was a job search method that yields success in the form of desirable employment more than 80% of the time? If you’re like most executives, you’d overlook this strategy in spite of its success rate. Why? Because it’s a bit more work than blindly applying to open positions on executive job boards or sending your resume to executive recruiters.
 
But if you don’t mind a little bit of work, this strategy is a winner and one that has the support of job search guru Richard Bolles of What Color Is Your Parachute? fame, not to mention your BlueSteps Executive Career Services team.

The 2015 BlueSteps Job Outlook Report just released by Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants, shows that 72.4 percent of management-level professionals worldwide feel more optimistic about their career opportunities for 2015, an increase of 21.4 percentage points compared to the previous year. 88.2 percent of management-level professionals responded that they are open to new opportunities in 2015.