Executive Career Management

Have you mastered the art of telling concise, meaningful, high-impact stories in all of your career marketing communications?
Just as it can be a challenge to be objective about yourself and your career, it is equally difficult to “self-edit” the information you share with others during critical career transitions. It can all seem important because you’re so close to it. And you don’t want to omit something that might possibly be relevant, so the tendency is to share everything and trust your readers/listeners to sort out the gold.

Ask many people in corporate America their Myers Briggs type and most likely they will be able to tell you their four-letter code, along with their astrological sign. Thanks to team building, and management skills training, we can describe ourselves with personality test terms such as Driver or Amiable as well.

BlueSteps chats with Lene Berge, BlueSteps Career Advisor, who recently published Uncover. Position. Thrive: Your Guide to Job Search and Career Growth.

lene_berge_career_management_book_authorFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to speak with BlueSteps about career management and your new book. Can you tell us a little about your background?

As companies become more global, international careers increase. Now is an excellent time for those who want to take advantage of these international opportunities – and the following guidelines will help.

First, Know Thyself
Knowing who you are is the first step in understanding your international career choices. The answer to your next best job lies within you. Your vision and dreams, career passion and purpose, values and beliefs, strengths and weaknesses, determine your performance today and in the future.
Second, Know What You Want

Sometimes career change is inevitable. As a culture and economy, we welcome progress, innovation, growth and change as good things. But there is always a price extracted in terms of jobs lost, product obsolescence, industry decline, business consolidations and careers uprooted.

In matters of the heart, logic seldom rules. If you were asked to explain why you loved your spouse or partner, you might be able to list traits and qualities that you admire, but you wouldn’t be able to give a factual, logical explanation of the attraction. You just “clicked.”

In our careers, that “click” is also extremely important. As you consider staying in your current job or making a transition, two points are worth considering.

The number of qualified executive candidates searching for new positions creates a highly competitive job market. Employers are more selective with their executive hires today than ever before.

How can you present yourself to be more hireable and beat your competition? The following four strategies are key.

1: Stand out with your resume.

Career gaps are a reality for many of us. Taking time to raise children, care for an ailing relative, manage our own health, study, travel and of course search for a job ... Whatever the reason, the resulting gap can cause challenges during the job search, especially if the time away from work is lengthy.
executive_career_managment_career_gapsExecutives often worry about how to address the gap on their resumes and LinkedIn profiles and what to say when networking and interviewing. Here are some strategies for dealing with gaps, with an eye toward minimizing the negative impact and managing any anxiety you may be feeling.

To help you achieve a productive and satisfying new chapter in your professional life, here are six tips on effective career management:
1. Set Goals: Your role might have changed or you might be re-examining your current job with a new perspective. Start by determining what's expected of you and set goals on how to meet those expectations. Do your homework. What priorities do you need to focus on in the next 30, 60, and 90 days? What resources need to be put into place for your success? What results will you deliver, and how will those be evaluated? Document this goal-setting plan to follow throughout the year.

As your career has advanced, so has your skill set and confidence. You now execute countless activities with precision. Create a five year business plan to grow revenue? No problem! Tabulate and document a financial plan to present to investors and the board? Done in 48 hours! Form the marketing plan to launch a new product in a new channel? Piece of cake! Envision and map a career plan for yourself supported with targeted marketing material? That might take a while.

There are endless reasons why executives turn to a career management service such as BlueSteps.