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Actively manage your career even when you're not actively looking. Learn about things you can and should doo between job searches to prepare to reach new career targets and build the skills and achievements you need to succeed and move up the career ladder.

Building Online Brand for Executive Job Seekers
Executive recruiters, search consultants, headhunters and hiring managers all share one thing in common – they all use search engines to screen potential executive job candidates or to find new executive talent.

Profit and Loss (P & L) responsibility is one of the most important responsibilities of any executive position. Having P & L responsibility involves monitoring the net income after expenses for a department or entire organization, with direct influence on how company resources are allocated. Those with P & L responsibility often give final approval for new projects and are required to find ways to cut budget expenditure and ensure every program is generating a positive ROI.

 

Rediscovering Your Career Passionby Ford R. Myers, Career Potential, LLC

Do you ever feel like you’ve lost touch with the enthusiasm and passion you once felt about your career?

Remember when you were just starting-out at your first job, or you were a recent graduate? You probably thought that any job would be available to you; that every employer would want to hire you. You were excited about your prospects and believed that you had something wonderful to share.

 

Putting Your Best Foot Forward

The following article was taken from the AESC's Candidates Bill of Rights - a document created to inform senior executives of how they should work with executive search consultants (also known as executive recruiters or headhunters). Read below to learn how to put your best foot forward and achieve the most out of each engagement with search consultants.
 

The ownership of developing one’s career rests more with the individual than with the employer. Although there are occasions when the employer initiates a move and provides exciting opportunities to high performing executives or those with unique expertise and skills, it is wise for the individual to initiate these opportunities. Senior Executives should evolve their career management strategy by assessing the surrounding environment and match potential opportunities or directions with career aspirations and needs. Assuming a passive role and expecting natural events to direct the best paths can only be construed as leaving control of one’s destiny entirely to others!

 
Over the years, I have worked with hundreds of key executives – CEOs, Partners, COOs, Presidents, Senior Vice Presidents, and so on. Top business professionals like these present unique challenges to the Career Consultant, because they face unique challenges in their own transitions! Specializing in working with this clientele, I have identified 10 distinct issues that senior executives usually confront with when conducting a job search – and I have developed practical solutions for each one of them:

#1 – EGO
  • Loss of self-esteem, identity, self-worth, and self-concept
  • Embarrassment, shame, and “tarnished” image
Interpersonal relationships are the greatest challenge for leaders in business, especially for those in senior executive management positions. As a leader you must prepare to operate across many racial, social and generational lines, and accommodate multiple working styles. Each situation, team and organization requires a specific approach. Gain a competitive edge in leadership positions by following the 6 critical steps outlined below by Adriana Prates, president and founder of AESC firm, Dasein.
 

1. Know the executive recruitment market – ask search consultants in your network to comment on your industry marketplace and learn from their outlook – which areas are performing well? Can your skills transfer to these areas? All BlueSteps members receive worldwide executive search industry reports from the Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC), with access to search industry expert speeches and panels.

I have seen many discussions and articles published recently that debate whether organizations prefer to hire internal or external executive job candidates. From my reading, I have found that many senior executives believe there is an overwhelming preference for the external candidate. Although the question of preference varies across geographical, organizational and individual circumstances - to offer a generalized answer would avoid the complexity involved in every hire - I would like to offer some hope to any senior executive who feels they cannot progress internally.

Internal Hiring Happens All the Time