Home

This may seem obvious, but it bears repeating – honesty is the best policy. The executive job search process is difficult enough – you don’t want to get inches away from an offer, only to miss out on the role of a lifetime. Below are some of the factors you should consider when deciding what should and shouldn’t be disclosed to a potential employer.

Executive Job Search - Background ChecksNegative Behavior or Debt Show Up During a Background Check

In this age of instantaneous communications and rapid sound bites, long gone is the luxury of correcting something said in haste. Today's proliferation of channels and technologies has completely obliterated any chance of a safety net. There is no place to hide. The old axioms we thought were destined for the dustbins of history now take on new purpose and vigor.

Much like a blind date, attending a networking event can bring up anxieties. Even the most experienced executive can have some apprehension about walking into an event alone and trying to integrate into groups of people and conversations. Since it is a fact that most jobs are found through networking, it is worth your time to avoid common missteps and hone your networking skills.

Stage One – Introductions

The time where executives could expect to spend their entire career in one company has long since evaporated. In today’s fast-changing executive career landscape, moving to new companies and shifting careers multiple times has become a professional norm, and is one that we all must adjust to.

Regardless of your current job status or whether or not you’re considering new executive opportunities, it is vital to have a well thought-out career management strategy in place. Executive careers can be unpredictable and if you are forced to enter a period of transition, you can reduce the time period with some careful forward planning. 

Being referred to a hiring manager by a trusted person increases an applicant’s odds of being hired 50–100X, according to Lou Adler, author of Performance-Based Hiring.
 
With odds like that, any job seeker would be foolish to ignore the power of networking. In fact, for an effective and efficient search, networking should be your primary strategy.
 
Not all executives believe this, however. I’ve heard lines like these countless times in my many years as a resume writer/career advisor:

Many executives fail to see the importance of building relationships with executive search consultants at times when they don’t immediately need their help. However, when an executive requires executive search assistance later in their career, it can be difficult to make a connection that is mutually beneficial to both parties.


In order to make sure that you can rely on the support from the executive search community when you need it, there are several pitfalls you need to avoid…

For those wanting to maximise their career potential, networking with an executive search consultant is vital to their career strategy. However, many executives are often left unsure regarding how to begin forming relationships with executive search consultants. Whether you are in an active job search, or just assessing your career options, if you would like to start networking with executive search consultants, BlueSteps has put together a short guide to make things easier.

Become More Visible

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of Executive Job Search Strategies for CIOs and CTOs, featuring Stephen Van Vreede, BlueSteps Executive Career Services.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

BlueSteps recently hosted two #ExecCareer Chats on the topic of Leveraging LinkedIn for Networking, featuring Jane Anderson and Barbara Safani, BlueSteps Executive Career Services Coaches.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

A robust online presence is important now more than ever.  Executive recruiters are searching the web for information about a potential executive candidate, and employers are checking online not only to gain information about potential hires, but to check on their current employees as well.