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There is simply nothing more useful than an authentic and from-the-heart endorsement or richly rewarded recommendation on LinkedIn, the world’s de facto connection utility. With a membership at some 400 million people, LinkedIn clearly is the platform of choice for business networking.

In today’s parlance you might characterize third party citations as earned endorsements or righteous recommendations. But the issue often is how do I get folks to write one for me without sacrificing authenticity or being too self-serving? And what is better, a full “recommendation” written by a co-worker, former boss or a quick “skills endorsement” notation by friend, family or colleague?

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of social media profiles, featuring Samuel Dergel, from Stanton Chase, Daniel Galin, from Daubenspeck and Associates, and Per-André Marum, from Panamera Search.

Some of the questions asked included:

Looking to give your executive resume, LinkedIn and career documents a boost? Here are a few quick tips to help.
 

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of LinkedIn networking, featuring John Touey, from Salveson Stetson Group, and Stephen Van Vreede, from BlueSteps Executive Career Services.

Some of the questions asked included:

For more on this topic, register for the "Top Strategies for Networking with Executive Search Consultants” webinar.

An integral part of any executive’s career strategy should involve networking and forming relationships with executive search consultants. Whether embarking on a job search or proactively managing their career progression, all executives should make time to work with search consultants.

Although retained executives search consultants work for the hiring organization, not the candidate, it is possible to build mutually convenient relationships with them to improve your career.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of in-person networking, featuring Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase, Susan Goldberg, from SGES, and John Touey, from Salveson Stetson Group.

Some of the questions asked included:

I picked up the phone, surprised by the caller ID; it was someone from a former social circle with whom I hadn’t talked to in years. There was little in common for us and, quite frankly, nearly every time I came into contact with her, she wanted to sell me something. But, after a lapse in communication of three years, I was intrigued to see her number pop up on my phone.

Was she getting married? Maybe she was moving to my neighborhood? Did she have a new job? Perhaps she was changing churches and wanted to visit mine? Curiosity got the best of me and I answered the call.
“Hi. I’m surprised to see your number. What’s new with you?” I said.

I get a lot of questions about using LinkedIn. For some of them, the answer is obvious. Should you put up a profile picture? Yes, of course. Some questions, however, have no definite answer.

Bear with me, as I try to explain some of the tricky situations you might encounter while using LinkedIn:
 

Is it a good idea to accept all invitations to connect on LinkedIn? If not, what criteria should be followed?

LinkedIn is business networking on steroids. Imagine going to a conference and receiving fifty business cards in 10 minutes, that’s how crazy it can get. But like typical networking events, some of the LinkedIn invites you receive will be of no interest to you.

Don’t accept all invites you get. Connect with a purpose.

When you hear the words social media, what do you think? Some believe it’s nothing more than an intrusion on their privacy, others are intimidated by it, and there are those who don’t believe it is worth their time. Although social media still generates some negative thoughts, more and more senior executives are gaining the experience and understanding the positive impact social media can have on the success of their careers, replacing any reservations or negativity they may have previously had. There are many things in our lives that we may not like that we’re free to change, but social media is not one of them!

Executive bios take branding to another level, linking an executive’s softer skills to their value proposition in a way that isn’t possible to emphasize in a resume. BlueSteps allows you to include your executive bio in your career profile, so it’s important to have a professionally written bio that will represent you in the best light. To clarify any confusion around executive bios, let’s look at a few points:

Purpose:

  • To reflect who you are and what you have accomplished in your career 
  • To reinforce your brand
  • To tell your career story with more personality

It complements your resume: