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“Here is the fact of the age. People believe nothing. They believe everything is spin and lies."
- Peggy Noonan, The Wall Street Journal

As we head into November and approach the end of the year, to say 2011 has been a volatile year for the global trust scale would be an understatement. From the Arab Spring and the Eurozone crisis to tumultuous partisan politics in the U.S. driving the economy to the brink of disaster, and the Occupy Wall Street movement gaining momentum worldwide, this is a year that has tested the limits of the concept of trust itself.

Anne Morriss identifies 5 ways that potential leaders, many of them highly talented individuals, create their own obstacles to achieving their potential:

1) Over-emphasizing personal goals

Leadership is not about you, it is about making other people better as a result of your presence. If you can make sure certain systems and cultures are in place, you can also ensure that people succeed even when you are not there. Those who succeed as leaders are those who have managed to shift the analytic focus from themselves to other people.

2) Distracted by personal image

In honor of the official American Business Women's Day on September 22nd, and the invaluable contributions female executives have made to global business, BlueSteps have launched an 'Executive Women in Business' Initiative for the month of September. We will be featuring content focused on the personal experiences of top female executives and the lessons learned along the way.

Take a look below at the last article submission by a BlueSteps member who won a competition to submit their stories of progression as women in business:

"No Glass Ceiling. Just Blue Sky". I must admit, Marcy Blochowiak’s book title summarizes my thoughts well! It may be an aspirational statement anywhere in the world, particularly in India, but I would like it to remain on the table.

It is well known that the focus on Women Leadership is driven primarily by two strong pillars - The Business (CEO’s Office) and The Function (HR). It is moving due to pressure from the global eco system from a "good to have" to a "must have". Diversity is increasingly a business imperative that is being watched by both the shareholders and the Board. With this hawk eye, it is not surprising that these pillars are focusing even more extensively on this space.

Everyone has their own ideas on which values and ideals are important in achieving your business goals. In this article I will share the thoughts of various leaders on which of these values are overrated, as recently feature by the Harvard Business Review.

Jonathon Gosling – Professor, University of Exeter Business School

Some companies have regularly scheduled reviews, but some don’t. Furthermore, in this chaotic market, even regular reviews might get pushed off. With the downsizing and restructuring in today’s market, your job may have changed significantly. You may have more responsibility or completely different tasks added to your plate. So you want a review to make sure you’re on track to meet your goals (and to confirm what these goals are in this ever-changing market). It is important to use these reviews to your advantage – as a chance to make adjustments in your approach, identify blind spots and figure out how you can contribute value-added to others.

In honor of the official American Business Women's Day on September 22nd, and the invaluable contributions female executives have made to global business, BlueSteps have launched an 'Executive Women in Business' Initiative for the month of September. We will be featuring content focused on the personal experiences of top female executives and the lessons learned along the way.

Take a look below at the fourth of five BlueSteps members who won a competition to submit their stories of progression as women in business:

“Social Intelligence and the Biology of Leadership,” first published by the Harvard Business Review (HBR) in September 2008, explores the direct affect social intelligence has on leadership success. HBR Senior Editor Diane Coutu sits down with the article’s co-author Daniel Goleman to discuss how emotional and social intelligence relate and differ; the benefits of social intelligence as it relates to leadership; and the integration of social intelligence into company culture.
 
Emotional Intelligence (EQ) vs. Social Intelligence (SQ)

The news earlier this week that Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc and CEO during the most successful period of its history - had stepped down prompted a dramatic drop in the companies shares, falling as much as 7 percent in the USA following the announcement. Jobs is so intrinsically linked to Apple that the news came as a shock to many, but the subsequent response asks the question: how important is a CEO to a company, and how deeply does a departure affect its wellbeing?

The fall in share prices suggests that shareholders fear that Jobs was so influential, and bore so much responsibility for the dramatic upturn in Apple’s fortunes in recent years, that his departure could begin a decline in their technological innovation and market domination.