Home

Although I research and teach about emotions, I also have clients, colleagues, and a family (including two cats, two dogs a husband, and an almost four-year-old), so I can very well understand why we all struggle sometimes. This afternoon, my son has been in the house for 15 minutes, has spilled water all over the kitchen floor and then walked in it with his dirty feet from outside, screamed (happily) about 100 times (or so it seems) while playing with one of the dogs, whined about having his nails cut and has been singing in between it all. Now, don’t get me wrong, I am very grateful to be able to work from home some of the time and have him come by for a hug once in a while and to just be here in the midst of the craziness of life.

Walmart may not have been the first company whose pricing policies forced suppliers to send jobs overseas, but it was, for years, the one with the highest public profile. Yet, like so many things involving marketplace dynamics, the issues that attracted the most attention had to do with the wages and benefits that Walmart offered employees. It’s a subject that makes good press but, ultimately, bad economics. By contrast, with the impact of offshoring, though, it’s almost insignificant.
 

The Good

I just don’t have the time.

We all say it, or at least think it, every day. We have to make some hard decisions on how we use our available time. We have to prioritize.

Our jobs and careers demand that we set priorities, too. I hear it every day from friends and colleagues – especially when they try to explain why they aren’t more involved with their industry associations.

The 2016 BlueSteps Job Outlook Report, just released by Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants, shows that global executive optimism has decreased 10.9 percentage points since 2014. Forty-one percent of respondents expect the number of senior management-level positions to remain sluggish as the number of professionals seeking a new opportunity continues to increase, reaching its highest point since 2010 - 90.2 percent.

In this interview, we talked to Stafford Bagot, from Heidrick & Struggles, about the results of the 2016 BlueSteps Executive Job Outlook report and his advice for candidates. Download the full report here.
 

Many executives expect the number of executive jobs to increase in 2016. Is now the time to make a move?

In this interview, we talked to Adriana Prates, from Dasein Executive Search, about the results of the 2016 BlueSteps Executive Job Outlook report and her advice for candidates. Download the full report here.
 

What global economic trends do you see having the most impact on executive jobs in the coming year?

In this interview, we talked to Shane Phillips, from The Phillips Group, about the results of the 2016 BlueSteps Executive Job Outlook report and his advice for candidates. Download the full report here.
 

Many executives expect the number of executive jobs to increase in 2016. Is now the time to make a move?

In this interview, we talked to Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase about the results of the 2016 BlueSteps Executive Job Outlook report and her advice for candidates. Download the full report here.

Many companies are including options for working from home now—and hopefully more and more will embrace the opportunity to employ home-based employees. It just makes sense for so many people and companies. After all of these years working for myself and working in academia, I cannot imagine going back to an environment where I am punching the theoretical time clock by working in an office all day, every day.

Stress is one of the most pervasive afflictions in the corporate sector today. The harm it can inflict is compounded by the fact that it is amorphous by nature, thereby preventing us from measuring it or even being aware of the extent to which it affects us. While there are reams of advice on the topic, I will attempt to summarize a few approaches for managing stress from my real-life experiences as a senior-level executive.