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If you are good at your job, you may find yourself being tasked with additional work such as implementing new initiatives or working with high profile clients. It is a common trend – those who do good work get more work. This can leave high-performing and trusted employees feeling overwhelmed and stressed.

Funny enough, the top result of a Google search on “being good at your job” is an article about the danger of being good at your job. A 2015 Duke University study found that having high self-control (an indicator of success) might have negative interpersonal costs, leading individuals to become burdened by others’ reliance.

This is an excerpt of "Technologies on the C-Suite Horizon," from AESC Executive Talent Magazine

Digital tools and disruptive technologies from artificial intelligence and machine learning to 3D printing, 5G, IoT, Robotic Process Automation, virtual and augmented reality are transforming communication, banking, HR, manufacturing, finance, medicine, agriculture and more. What are some of the latest tools and technologies? How will organizations harness cutting-edge developments for competitive advantage? And what are the qualities of the leader who cannot only guide organizations through this disruption, but also the disruptions no one has imagined, yet?

In our modern business world, the only thing we really can be certain of is uncertainty. Every day, there seems to be a new piece of news, whether it is a governmental policy, technological advancement, or consumer insight, that impacts the way organizations do business. Changes move so quickly that companies are looking for new all-stars to help right the ship and steer the organization towards where it needs to go. next generation talent

When a White House policy is broad enough to affect both computer programmers and NBA players, it’s a remarkable decision. Yet that’s the impact of the executive order (EO), nicknamed the "Muslim Ban," that bars citizens from seven Middle Eastern countries from entering the United States. The order’s Constitutional legality will be decided by the courts, but what won’t be decided, in the short term at least, is the impact that the EO has on how and whom American businesses hire.

As an executive recruiter in Silicon Valley, I keep an eye on technology trends and the implications for executive talent. Read about the latest technology trends:

 

  • Connected economy
  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Cybersecurity
  • Data science, data analytics and machine learning
  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • Customer Success
  • Healthcare IT
  • Diversity

 

Businesses have all faced a similar situation: should they pursue profit exclusively or should they risk reducing it by spending money to minimize or eliminate their products’ and services’ harmful effects?

Propaganda is a despot’s favorite tool. Yet dictators no longer dictate what’s said. It’s guys like Paris Wade and Ben Goldman whose stories are designed to lure the partisan and gullible…and earn them tens of thousands of dollars a month in fees for the ads that appear on their site.

One could admire their entrepreneurship, but that would be like applauding Josef Goebbels for attracting large crowds. The results of their work could spell disaster – for politics, business, and society.
 

When you click on a link and get dumped into 404 limbo, that’s not good. But when a link’s completely dead, that’s even worse.

Calling a number on a company’s website and reaching a retiree in Boise is unfortunate. Hearing “The number you have dialed has been disconnected or is no longer in service,” may suddenly classify your prospect or customer as “former.”
 

how_404_errors_and_other_little_mistakes_impact_businessMinor to Major

The future looks great from the past.

The videophone. The bar code. The computer mouse. The digital audio player. The personal digital assistant. Each was innovative. Each was ahead of its time. Each solved a problem that nobody had. So, if nobody could or even wanted to use those inventions, were they really innovative?

He drives a Tesla. She drives a Leaf. His is leased, hers was bought outright. He wanted to drive in the carpool lane (without the extra passenger). She wanted to contribute to cleaner air. He got the top-speed model to go zero to 60 in under three seconds. Hers can barely make it in ten.

Yet, she dry cleans her jeans, colors her hair with peroxide-based dye, and orders take-out food three times a week. He loves to cook every night with organic ingredients, drops his clothes off at a fluff-and-fold that uses earth-friendly detergent, and charges his car with a solar-panel system.