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This is an excerpt of AESC's report Leading Transformation: Shaping the C-Suite for Business. In the excerpt, AESC member executive recruiters how they believe the C-level leaders will need to evolve to compete in Business 4.0.

 
Must some C-Suite roles change more dramatically than others to meet the demands of Business 4.0? “All C-Suite functions are impacted in one way or another,” commented a consultant based in the UK. “No one function is exempt.”
 

CEOs Must Drive the Culture Change

Global business leaders understand the need to transform their organizations, leverage emerging technologies, and identify new opportunities in the marketplace. However, a common barrier is a lack of leaders who can establish the right culture for innovation and transformation. AESC's Leading Transformation report highlights what business leaders need to know to attract, develop and become executives who can foster innovative cultures and digitally transform enterprises.  

Marketing has never been more integrated within the business, and never more challenging to execute. As customers demand more and businesses look to run lean and mean, it’s harder than ever to get it all done.

That doesn’t mean marketing executives are backing down. Instead, they’re looking for solutions and charging ahead, driving a loyal customer base by thinking outside of the box, and even taking it back to the basics.

 

Staying Compliant in Highly Regulated Industries

Overcome it: Provide compliant materials

While the average tenure of chief marketing officers (CMOs) has remained relatively steady at the top 100 most-advertised brands (44 months in 2017 and 42 months in 2016), it’s worth mentioning that the early part of 2018 has proven to be quite extraordinary – and not in a good way. An usually high number of well-known brands that we track across a number of key industries have undergone a change in the top marketing role this year.

Sometimes hard work and dedication to your job can only get you so far. If you have a clear career goal, but are finding yourself unable to move past your current level to the C-Suite, it might be time to change strategy and gain more understanding of what it takes to become a C-level executive.

CTOs & tech executives are critical to any business, and as our digital world evolves, their skills and the value of their team increases. The team is needed to manage cybersecurity, maintain the website, and build new product features (among dozens of other tasks), all while leaders are trying to build and run a successful team, manage expectations, maintain tight budgets and so much more.

As 2017 stretched its arms and exhaled a low yawn, I began pondering what the new year would bring. A lot of great Sales Directors wonder something similar, looking forward to what their pipeline has in store. Having tackled most of the C-Suite in my previous articles, it was high time that I looked at this lucrative newcomer to the top table and it seemed that the answer to the previous question was a resounding “No” – 89% of respondents from an initial 331 Sales Directors that I reached out to weighed in to say as much.

A sample of the responses received regards “Are you happy with your pipeline for 2018?” sales officer

The role of the 21st Century Chief Financial Officer is drastically different from its traditional book-keeping function. Deloitte tried to map this transition with their article 2011 “The Four Faces of the CFO”, but their failure is that they stop at the theoretical and haven’t gone the extra step to put figures to their ideas. I wanted to see if I could do just that. As such, I got in touch with 449 Chief Financial Officers in Australasia and asked them to look at a more recent article by Deloitte where they delineated that a CFO tends to fit into one of the four categories listed below.

Over the last five years, I have had the pleasure of working with and career counselling some of New Zealand’s leading lights in terms of Board Members, C-suite executives and IT technicians. This extraordinary experience has helped me garner a greater understanding of my industry and opened my eyes to new perspectives of how people from all corners of the globe operate in a business environment. One point that has always particularly fascinated me however, is how the southern hemisphere measures up to its northern counterpart. In many respects, there is negligible difference in business ideas and performance, but that’s not to say that there doesn’t seem to be some small element of playing catch up when it comes to corporate structure.

The role of the Chief Technology Officer came about in the 1980s, becoming prominent in the 1990s with the conception of the big internet companies. Tom Berray  in The Role of the CTO: Four Models for Success explains that, for businesses, the “CTO role is a low-cost addition to the organization [that] can help reap potentially high pay-offs by identifying and elevating critical opportunities”. Finding a great CTO that meshes with a company’s corporate identity however, can seem more a challenge than discovering a unicorn might.