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Executive Education and Training

Never look a gift horse in the mouth. There has been no time in history where it has been easier or more efficient to sculpt your personal brand to highlight your passion, spotlight your skills and expose, to the world, your accomplishments. The proliferation of platforms has made it possible to deftly create or surface a specific identity that conveys who you are, your particular interests and your ultimate objective in life.

Last year, Linkedin opened up long-form posts to the general membership. Prior to that time only Influencers (famous people, leaders in their field) designated by Linkedin were allowed to write those short, pithy articles that accumulated and were archived on their profile pages. The rest of us had been relegated to ephemeral Linkedin Updates that disappeared into the news thread once posted.
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In July of 2014, when the little pen icon appeared on the update box, intrepid trail blazers began posting on their Linkedin Profiles. Overnight, a plethora of short articles, essays, and observations with accompanying images populated profiles.

The Journey Toward Big Data

Since the 1990’s companies have been seeking to bring together internal and external data sources in order to gain a unique competitive insight other competitors did not have. The main problem was finding these customer insights due to a lack of available external data sources to match against internal data sources.

Moving abroad for your next executive opportunity can bring a range of career benefits to those who are willing. It can lead to an immediate increase in salary; it is not uncommon for executive hotshots in São Paolo to receive $600,000 per annum.

And, a move abroad can also lead to future financial gains too. An employee’s chances of promotion are greatly improved when they have worked abroad due to perceived personal benefits, such as global market understanding, specific product knowledge, improved work ethic, technical expertise, willingness to be flexible and proven ability to adapt to new and challenging environments.

Patrick Lencioni wrote the book, Death by Meeting, over a decade ago; and despite many more articles and books about how to improve team interaction, too many meetings continue to be boring and unproductive.

Have you ever sat through an hour-long meeting and thought halfway through that it feels like you have already been there for an hour and a half?  If not, you can stop reading. If you are still reading, that is no surprise. Sadly, I think most meetings feel like they go on and on and oftentimes not much, if anything is accomplished.

This may seem obvious, but it bears repeating – honesty is the best policy. The executive job search process is difficult enough – you don’t want to get inches away from an offer, only to miss out on the role of a lifetime. Below are some of the factors you should consider when deciding what should and shouldn’t be disclosed to a potential employer.

Executive Job Search - Background ChecksNegative Behavior or Debt Show Up During a Background Check

Asians are poorly represented in senior roles across the West. Research by the Diversity Council of Australia (DCA) shows that a measly 1.9% of senior executives in ASX200 companies were of Asian descent even though they represent 9.6% of the general population. This situation is mirrored in other countries, including the USA and Canada. Asian Americans account for just 1.4% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 1.9% of corporate officers overall. So what are the causes and what can be done?

In this age of instantaneous communications and rapid sound bites, long gone is the luxury of correcting something said in haste. Today's proliferation of channels and technologies has completely obliterated any chance of a safety net. There is no place to hide. The old axioms we thought were destined for the dustbins of history now take on new purpose and vigor.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive search and your human resources career, featuring Rick Cannellos, Epsen Fuller Group, and Sally Stetson, Salveson Stetson Group.

Some of the questions asked included:

Much like a blind date, attending a networking event can bring up anxieties. Even the most experienced executive can have some apprehension about walking into an event alone and trying to integrate into groups of people and conversations. Since it is a fact that most jobs are found through networking, it is worth your time to avoid common missteps and hone your networking skills.

Stage One – Introductions