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Executive Education and Training

Most executives that are not in technology or media companies cringe when blogging is suggested to them. The stereotype of bloggers is that of people ranting and raging on ridiculous topics, or writing a daily diary of their mundane lives. Well, it may have started that way but it has evolved into a strategic marketing tool for both companies and professionals wanting to advance their careers.

Rationale for Blogging

Is there a compelling rationale for executive blogging? Yes. In fact there are statistics that demonstrate that as well.

It’s fairly easy to craft a professional brand for career advancement when you’ve been building on the same career track the whole time. Your brand is essentially a summary of what you’ve been doing all this while and how you’re ready to take it to a whole new level. But what do you do if you’re looking for a career change?
 
The good news is that the biggest obstacle career changers face is more often one of perception rather than ability—in other words, it’s not so much a matter of having the requisite skills to take on a new role but convincing others that you can make the switch. (Of course, this assumes you do, in fact, have the technical skillset and necessary qualifications.)
 

When launching your executive job search campaign while employed, there are always a few concerns. The biggest concern is that your current employer might find out. Some consider this “disloyal” behavior, even if they themselves would have no issue with poaching an executive from a competitor.

A few companies have internal or unwritten policies that an employee (executive or otherwise) who is discovered searching for a new job should be replaced as soon as possible, rather than be stuck having to quickly fill a key position when that person gives notice. For this reason, if your job search is discovered, the company may start to seek your replacement, even if you haven’t announced you’re looking, much less leaving.

Like the people who write them, all executive resumes are unique, but there are seven common pitfalls that are often made by those who write their own resumes. To improve your chances of success, and keep your resume out of the trash pile, here is a breakdown of what you need to look out for.

1. Not Optimizing Your Resume

BlueSteps chats with Paul Chau, Senior Client Partner, Global Technology Market at Korn Ferry, about the latest trends for technology executives in the CIO, CTO and CISO roles. Download the full white paper, Executive Search & Career Forecast: Evolving Technology and Security Roles.

How would you describe the outlook for technology executives in Hong Kong and the greater China region?

BlueSteps chats with Suzanne Garber, founder and chairwoman of Gauze, an international healthcare technology firm dedicated to connecting patients with hospitals around the world, and author of the recently published book, SAFETY NETwork: A Tale of Ten Truths of Executive Networking.

Suzanne GarberFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to speak with BlueSteps about executive networking and your new book, Safety NETwork. Can you tell us a little about your background?

Columbia Business School, an AESC and BlueSteps partner, hosted an event on February 9, 2015 about board leadership. This was moderated by Karen Greenbaum, President and CEO of the AESC. The panelists included Patrick Prout, President and CEO of the Prout Group, Carrie Pryor, Managing Director of Greenwhich Harbour Partners, and George Willbanks, Managing Partner of Willbanks Partners, LLC.
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In-person networking events can cause apprehension for even the most experienced executives. However, attending such events can have a huge impact on your career trajectory, so it is vital that executives should make time for networking in their schedules.

Even if you are not actively seeking a new role, it is important to start building your network as soon as possible. The key to efficient networking has always been to build a network before you need one. It is vital to remember that networking should always be a mutually beneficial practice and you should try to have something to offer those you are seeking to connect with.

When writing their own resume, executives the world over tend to focus on standard job duties rather than results. This approach inevitably falls flat. It causes a resume to read like a dull, copy and paste job description rather than an engaging account of a person’s unique work record.

Every professional action has a result. At the executive level, that result is usually more interesting than the action itself. You’ve no doubt engaged in activities that changed and benefited your employers in profound ways. Describe those benefits on your resume, and you’ll have a much stronger job search document.

Last month when NACD joined the Global Network of Director Institutes (GNDI) to convene a “cyber summit,” the 200-seat event filled quickly with the key to the future: people—namely directors, chief executives, and information executives empowered to build corporate value and form a powerful bulwark against information destruction.