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Executive Education and Training

In my days as a hiring agent, I saw my fair share of applicants who were befuddled by the cover letter vs. E-note conundrum. As I opened their emails, I could almost see them—brows furrowed, hesitating to click “send”—puzzled by what on earth to write in the email, since they were also attaching a cover letter.

Corporate HR and accounting departments frequently ask us: “Does employee classification really matter?” 
The answer is “yes”, because the misclassification of workers as something other than employees presents a serious problem for the affected employees and impacts the US economy. Moreover, it is now especially important for all US Companies since the US Department of Labor’s (DOL) Misclassification Initiative under the leadership of Vice President Biden’s Middle Class Taskforce. Now, the DOL is making huge strides in combating this nagging issue and to restoring rights to those denied them.

Nearly every time I talk with executives about their job search and the career documents they need the long-standing question comes up…

Do I really need a cover letter and is it really being read? executive_job_search_cover_letter

Some executives will tell me that they personally don’t read candidate cover letters (the reasons: they are usually not well written, sound canned, not tailored, etc.). Others will tell me that they do read them—some before they read the resume and others after they read the resume, looking for consistency between the two documents and interest in their company and the position.

For more on this topic, register for the "Top Strategies for Networking with Executive Search Consultants” webinar.

An integral part of any executive’s career strategy should involve networking and forming relationships with executive search consultants. Whether embarking on a job search or proactively managing their career progression, all executives should make time to work with search consultants.

Although retained executives search consultants work for the hiring organization, not the candidate, it is possible to build mutually convenient relationships with them to improve your career.

I get a lot of questions about using LinkedIn. For some of them, the answer is obvious. Should you put up a profile picture? Yes, of course. Some questions, however, have no definite answer.

Bear with me, as I try to explain some of the tricky situations you might encounter while using LinkedIn:
 

Is it a good idea to accept all invitations to connect on LinkedIn? If not, what criteria should be followed?

LinkedIn is business networking on steroids. Imagine going to a conference and receiving fifty business cards in 10 minutes, that’s how crazy it can get. But like typical networking events, some of the LinkedIn invites you receive will be of no interest to you.

Don’t accept all invites you get. Connect with a purpose.

I recently read a really (sadly) negative article about why the author was sick of emotional intelligence (EI/sometimes EQ). I am not going to send further traffic that way by citing it, but I am sure if you care enough to search it out—it won’t be difficult to find. It is disappointing to see that it has received many views to date. Perhaps there are others like me who are simply just interested to see how something positive can incite such a negative reaction. We know that negativity is a powerful emotion and that it is more contagious than positivity—I cannot imagine why anyone would seek to encourage it.

There is no better time to be a CIO than now. If there is one role in the executive suite that will have impact in the next five years it is that of the IT leader.

PWC put out a study which said that the top five concerns of CEO are: Security, Analytics, Mobility, Cloud and IoT (Internet of Things). They are ALL technology related. If this isn’t a huge opportunity for the CIO, then I don’t know what is! 

CIOs have the ability to drive both the top and bottom lines of an organization – we just have to take the opportunity that currently presents itself, get our ideas out, and be effective players in the leadership team. It’s all about adding value and the art of the possible.

This article addresses what CIOs can do about the top line.
 

It may go without saying that having an internationally focused, branded bio, resume or CV and other career marketing materials is a must if you want to be seriously considered for jobs overseas or an international assignment.

But in an increasingly competitive and global marketplace, even if you are not looking to work abroad, having a more international profile can help you stand out and strengthen your application for many types of positions.

Executive bios take branding to another level, linking an executive’s softer skills to their value proposition in a way that isn’t possible to emphasize in a resume. BlueSteps allows you to include your executive bio in your career profile, so it’s important to have a professionally written bio that will represent you in the best light. To clarify any confusion around executive bios, let’s look at a few points:

Purpose:

  • To reflect who you are and what you have accomplished in your career 
  • To reinforce your brand
  • To tell your career story with more personality

It complements your resume:

Oscar*, a recently down-sized finance executive, had no interest in attending the wedding of a neighbor’s daughter. His lack of motivation to engage in social activities was a common side effect of corporate terminations. In fact, he was more apt to engage in a pity party than a celebratory reception. But, realizing that “happy wife, happy life” had longer lasting consequences, he acquiesced to his wife’s urgings to attend, albeit unenthusiastically.