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Senior Executive Career Management

Top achievers in all fields rely on coaches to help them achieve maximum levels of performance. As an executive, you can benefit from working with a coach during several critical phases of your career:

The level of responsibility that goes hand in hand with an executive role can leave little time to think about personal career management. And when your greatest career advances have been thanks to your ability to improve performance, drive change, and develop your organization, it may feel like focusing on business results is managing your career. Besides, your current role may be such a great opportunity and challenge that the thought of “what’s next” may not even come to mind yet.

Have you considered that one of the major success factors for organizations are the people who work there? It is crucial to have the right people in the right place at the right time. But how do companies identify and develop these skilled people and leaders? Leading organizations recruit superior people, develop their knowledge, skills and abilities, and prepare them for advancement or promotion.

During my everyday conversations with clients and candidates, one topic often tops the discussion agenda: The progression of a career and how it can evolve. At times, when you critically analyze your career, you find that your career just happened. My experience as a search consultant has shown me that many people don’t plan their career progression because they believe there are too many factors that will make it too hard to plan their career paths.

But, this is not actually the case for successful people. Many successful people identify their core goals and plan the actionable steps to help them achieve those goals.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive career coaching, featuring Adriana Prates, Dasein Executive Search, Lucie Shaw, Amrop UK, and Lisa Thompson, Pearson Partners International.

Some of the questions asked included:

Have you mastered the art of telling concise, meaningful, high-impact stories in all of your career marketing communications?
 
Just as it can be a challenge to be objective about yourself and your career, it is equally difficult to “self-edit” the information you share with others during critical career transitions. It can all seem important because you’re so close to it. And you don’t want to omit something that might possibly be relevant, so the tendency is to share everything and trust your readers/listeners to sort out the gold.
 

Ask many people in corporate America their Myers Briggs type and most likely they will be able to tell you their four-letter code, along with their astrological sign. Thanks to team building, and management skills training, we can describe ourselves with personality test terms such as Driver or Amiable as well.

BlueSteps chats with Lene Berge, BlueSteps Career Advisor, who recently published Uncover. Position. Thrive: Your Guide to Job Search and Career Growth.

lene_berge_career_management_book_authorFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to speak with BlueSteps about career management and your new book. Can you tell us a little about your background?

As companies become more global, international careers increase. Now is an excellent time for those who want to take advantage of these international opportunities – and the following guidelines will help.
 
IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES

First, Know Thyself
Knowing who you are is the first step in understanding your international career choices. The answer to your next best job lies within you. Your vision and dreams, career passion and purpose, values and beliefs, strengths and weaknesses, determine your performance today and in the future.
 
Second, Know What You Want

Sometimes career change is inevitable. As a culture and economy, we welcome progress, innovation, growth and change as good things. But there is always a price extracted in terms of jobs lost, product obsolescence, industry decline, business consolidations and careers uprooted.