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Actively manage your career even when you're not actively looking. Learn about things you can and should doo between job searches to prepare to reach new career targets and build the skills and achievements you need to succeed and move up the career ladder.

Are you considering your next strategic career move? During this workshop, a team of expert career advisors discuss how you can set a goal for your career and the work you can do to make sure you build a career plan that gets you to where you want to be. 
 

This workshop recording covers:

Is your LinkedIn Profile attracting new executive opportunities for you? Does your social media present you as a prominent executive leader in your industry? Executive search consultants and potential employers will examine your online presence during the search process to gather information and make critical decisions regarding your candidacy.

Reach your career goals with the BlueSteps ‘Executive’s Guide to LinkedIn.’

As LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional networking site, having a strong and professional presence on the platform should be part of every executive’s ongoing career strategy.

Mentoring! If one were to do the equivalent of a keyword search for the number of pop-ups of this word in conversations, and if advertisers were to get into the fray, one could literally put one’s money where one’s mouth is!!

As a resume specialist, I certainly understand that it would be great to wake up thrilled at the prospect of going to work every day. However, for the majority this is simply not a reality – and that’s OK.

On the flip side, it’s NOT OK to wake up every day and dread going to work.

For many, if the pros of the role outweigh the cons, then the role is likely a decent fit – for now. But, these cons might be signs that it’s time for a new career.

Can you recession-proof your career? The ubiquitous advice always boils down to doing whatever it takes to keep your job. You are admonished to work harder, curry the boss’s favor, or take a class to build skills. With a focus on survival rather than success, recession-proofing doesn’t apply at the executive level.

A lot of people are afraid of public speaking. If you ask a psychologist, they would attribute it to a fear of oneself, not of the audience! When queried recently on the topic, I introspected, glanced through my documents and came up with the list below:

Several years ago, a coaching client of mine contemplated the next step in his career. At the time, he was a Vice President of Marketing and Business Development. His ambition was to become a CEO, but uncertainty clouded his decision-making. We reviewed the qualities of successful leaders and identified a strategy that included increased participation in meetings and conversations about the business as a whole, not just marketing. Our sessions gave him insight into his relevant strengths and ones he would need to develop. As his confidence improved, he experienced marked success influencing his boss and members of the executive team. In time he was able to clarify the next step - working in a venture capital firm.

These days, sabbaticals are a hot talking point. More and more companies are deciding to give their employees the chance to take time out of their everyday (professional) lives, but which aspects have to be considered when company executives consider taking the sabbatical plunge? Beate Stelzer, Partner at Signium Germany, posed this question to some top-class managers; all of whom decided to treat themselves to a time-out.

When was the last time you had your car serviced? Six months…a year…two years? You’ve probably done it more recently than two years, because you want to make sure your car continues to operate reliably and get you where you need to go. Something similar could be said about your career management strategy. You can’t expect it to continue serving you well if you don’t take good care of it and change it when needed.

career mapping

Reevaluate Your Career Mapping Strategy