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During a mentoring session with new recruits, the nuanced topic of culture was an oft-repeated theme. “What is the culture of the organization like?” and “how do we fit in?” It set me thinking. While we all understand culture intuitively, cognitively speaking, there is hardly an area which is more difficult to articulate. Having been a student of sociology, I found the textbook definition somewhat abstract.

What makes a great workplace? Trust is essential. Pride in the work is key. Camraderie strengthens teamwork.

What are some important traits of leaders who are able to achieve a thriving workplace?

Ashton Ward, managing partner of AESC member firm Eton Bridge Partners, believes that culture within a business is the key to success.

Directing the strategy and satisfying shareholders are essential responsibilities of any CEO, however in my experience the culture, driven by the right values and behaviors should be at the top of the list.

“Clients do not come first. Employees come first. Look after your employees and they will look after your clients.” Richard Branson.

Change cultures through changing behaviors

When discussing cultural differences, we tend to think in terms of national culture. Culture, however, goes beyond nationality and is referred to as “the pattern of beliefs, behaviors, and values maintained by groups of interacting people.” (Milton J. Bennett, Ph.D). This implies that there are several types of culture: regional, gender, religion, professional, corporate and generational.

This is an excerpt of AESC's report Leading Transformation: Shaping the C-Suite for Business. In the excerpt, AESC member executive recruiters how they believe the C-level leaders will need to evolve to compete in Business 4.0.

CMOs Must Evangelize Customer Centricity and Acrossthe Enterprise

This is an excerpt of "Technologies on the C-Suite Horizon," from AESC's report Leading Transformation: Shaping the C-Suite for Business. In the excerpt, AESC member executive recruiters share what they think makes an innovative business leader in today's Business 4.0 world.

 

Innovators Are Courageous

Whether supervising people or projects, leadership is not only time consuming but can be mentally and emotionally taxing. Navigating difficult situations, working with strong personalities or balancing life and work, being a leader isn’t just a 9-5 job. It requires well-honed skills (sometimes new ones), discernment, decisiveness and the ability to act under pressure.

 “Where giggers were once responding to market conditions, they are now creating the conditions, disrupting the traditional workforce as we know it.” Korn Ferry Institute

With a name appropriated from performance culture where musicians play a limited engagement, or a “gig,” the gig economy describes the expanding labor market comprised of contract workers, freelancers, crowdsourced workers, and others who are hired for limited engagements, as well as platform-based systems—think ride sharing, delivery, and property rentals. Independent work is growing with the internet, and expanding from developed to developing economies as more of the world becomes digitally connected.

CTOs & tech executives are critical to any business, and as our digital world evolves, their skills and the value of their team increases. The team is needed to manage cybersecurity, maintain the website, and build new product features (among dozens of other tasks), all while leaders are trying to build and run a successful team, manage expectations, maintain tight budgets and so much more.

Leadership is as evergreen a topic as it gets! During a bout of team coaching visits recently, I created a compendium of qualities to start off our conversations as a team. Here is the list to help inspire you and your team: