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Read these BlueSteps Executive Search blog articles for the latest tips that will help improve your executive resume and your brand.

“The added value of retained executive search is not just finding candidates; it’s finding the best candidates.” Rachel Roche, President of Smart Search

Earlier today, BlueSteps hosted the #ExecCareer TweetChat featuring our expert BlueSteps Executive Career Services (BECS) panelists. Our expert career panelists, Barbara Safani and Stephen Van Vreede, provided very informative and useful answers for all in attendance.
 
If you missed it, catch up on all the excellent advice that was given in the Storyfy transcript below. Topics covered included:

Very few of us have the luxury of sitting back and letting the world come to us especially when it comes to maintaining an executive presence. Maintaining and raising your executive profile is an exercise in continuous improvement and one that pays dividends in a competitive executive job market. 
 
Here are a number of ways that you can stay relevant and active even when you’re not conducting an executive job search:
 

How to Write an Executive Resume That Targets Executive Search Consultants

Executive resume writing has long been the subject of experts teaching the tricks of the trade. The good news is that there are things that you can do to make your executive resume more attractive to search consultants. But beware - there is nothing that can dress up a mediocre track record to make it look stellar.
 

Many global professionals and executives would describe themselves as busy. Especially those that are very career oriented. Some would say too busy to work on their online profile or reputation on an ongoing basis – or at all.
 
But as I tell my clients, not having time does not change the reality of today's digital and globalized marketplace. A strong online profile or reputation is critical to optimizing your chances of landing a new position. Especially given the competition for top jobs globally.

 
Blogs are a powerful tool in building your online reputation
Companies typically don’t intend to discriminate, but if they have doubts, they may use age as the factor that screens you out. Your job as the candidate is to leave the impression that there is no one more qualified for the job than you. Whether you are young and have risen quickly in your career, or you’re older with a long record of success, here are some strategies you can use during your next executive job search.

Your Executive Resume or CV

LinkedIn has rapidly grown into the dominant online network for professionals. It’s a venue for you to be found by executive recruiters and potential employers, a great way for you to extend your professional network, and the perfect forum for building your online visibility and showcasing your expertise.
 
It’s essential to make your LinkedIn profile as powerful, professional, and distinctive as possible. If yours is incomplete, weak, or simply a reiteration of your executive resume/CV, use these tips to make sure your profile is helping, not hurting, your career transition:
 
1. Make it personal:

Is social media a waste of time or a valuable networking tool that can help you stand out to potential employers and executive recruiters? The answer is actually both depending on how you use it. If used properly, social networking gives you a chance to demonstrate your thought leadership and set yourself apart from your competition. As an executive and leader, it is critical to demonstrate your expertise online and manage your online brand with the following tips.
 

Understanding and communicating your brand will help you in all stages of your job search, as well as in managing your career going forward.  Do you have a rock solid brand message that clearly and concisely is achieving the results you desire? If not, it’s no longer a “nice to have, but a must have.” Don’t waste valuable time when some of the best opportunities exist in the job market.
 
Think of Coca Cola. Do you have a picture of a can of Coca Cola clearly in your mind? What do you see? Red and white/silver aluminum can with distinctive lettering. Now picture a glass of Coke, just an ordinary glass with a dark colored beverage inside. It could be Coke, but it could also be Pepsi; it could even be root beer.