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You’ve got the degrees, the highly sought-after skills, the years of leadership experience, and the impressive job titles to boot. You are armed with incredible success stories to delight and impress interviewers, but so far, your resume hasn’t garnered enough interest for you to be able to tell them in person.

If you’re beginning to wonder why your phone isn’t ringing, maybe it’s time to ask yourself if that resume of yours is effectively marketing you for the role you are seeking.

If you’re like many executives, at some point along your career path, you may find yourself wanting to go in a new direction. Maybe you’ve built a solid career in finance but find you no longer enjoy it and are eager to branch out into another aspect of business. Perhaps you have your eyes set on ultimately reaching a general management role and want to broaden your experience to prepare yourself for that level of oversight.

In tough economic times, the need for executives to effectively manage their careers—whether actively seeking employment or not—becomes critical for weathering the storm.

As an executive resume writer, a story I hear again and again from my clients is that they’ve never had to look for a job in their life; opportunities have just come their way…until now.

Are you using the right tool for the job? As an executive resume and LinkedIn profile writer, a common misconception I come across in my work is the belief that a LinkedIn profile should be merely an online version of one’s resume.

Most people know how important SEO (search engine optimization) is for driving traffic to websites, but many executive job seekers don’t realize that these same principles apply to their LinkedIn profiles. Without strong SEO, all of the time and effort you spend on LinkedIn in the hopes of advancing your executive career search may be in vain.

Below are some quick tips on how you can increase the visibility of your online profile and optimize it for LinkedIn’s search algorithm.
 

1. Make sure your public profile is visible.

Many executives are at a loss when it comes to networking on social media, particularly if they are relatively new to it, or if they are simply more comfortable with face-to-face interactions.

executive_networkingIt’s important to remember that social media networking is still networking—the essence doesn’t change just because it takes place online.

So let’s review what networking is (according to the Random House Learner’s Dictionary of American English):

“The informal sharing of information and services among individuals or groups that have a common interest”

With the holidays well underway, the season of excess is upon us. There are too many parties to go to and too many delicious things to tempt us. But as we all know, when it’s your third holiday gathering in one week and you are facing yet another table full of rich delights, you may begin to appreciate those heavy dishes less and long for a lighter meal.

As a BlueSteps executive resume writer, I spend a lot of time evaluating resumes and CVs and sharing insights regarding the ways in which my clients can improve their career literature—and to be honest, I see a lot of good resumes.

Most executives I work with have impressive achievements and strong selling points, such as MBAs from prestigious universities, fluency in multiple languages, and experience in leading some of the biggest names in global business. Sometimes this information alone will garner enough interest for them to be invited to an interview.

In my days as a hiring agent, I saw my fair share of applicants who were befuddled by the cover letter vs. E-note conundrum. As I opened their emails, I could almost see them—brows furrowed, hesitating to click “send”—puzzled by what on earth to write in the email, since they were also attaching a cover letter.

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