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There is a tectonic shift influencing the Hidden Job Market worldwide for transport and mobility solutions. China’s effort to the lead the world in electric vehicles, an industry which will account for 90% of vehicles by 2035. Let me highlight the top three:

Let me present yourself one of the deadliest and yet often most easily neglected mistake you can do as executive in career transition: Having a big EGO. Let me show you three examples and the negative consequences of a big ego for job search success.

 

Mistake Number 1: “I can do it.”

Your resume tells who you are. Simply put, you are what you write, and not what you think you are. An executive maybe a worldwide SVP of Sales, but the resume presents you as a middle manager. You may be an industry-agnostic General Manager, but your resume makes you an automotive industry expert. You may rank high in an investment bank, but you fail to communicate your responsibility and 100 staff under you.

As companies become more global, international careers increase. Now is an excellent time for those who want to take advantage of these international opportunities – and the following guidelines will help.
 
IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES

First, Know Thyself
Knowing who you are is the first step in understanding your international career choices. The answer to your next best job lies within you. Your vision and dreams, career passion and purpose, values and beliefs, strengths and weaknesses, determine your performance today and in the future.
 
Second, Know What You Want

According to Richard Koch, the author of the business classic about the Pareto Law ("The 80/20 Principle”), our top six business relationships account for more than all of the rest of our contacts. No more than six people. He points out that 80 percent of the value of our relationships comes from 20 percent of our relationships. Are you one of those who, according to Koch, spend much less than 80 percent of your attention on the 20 percent of relationships that create 80 percent of that value?
 

At the end of the year, we often reflect on our goals for the New Year and beyond. As you think about your career goals, you may consider focusing on incorporating something you're passionate about.

Know Your Passion
It probably will not surprise you to know that the majority of people are not passionate about their work. In the United States, 77% have no job passion (Deloitte LLP, 2010); in Japan the number is 60% (The CONNECTYOU Report, 2009).
 

Almost all executives are aware of this little country, but for most executives and expanding companies, Japan plays a relatively small role compared to neighboring China. This article is therefore intended to throw light on Japan’s globalizing economy and the executive opportunities that are opening up there.
 

Many in the corporate world lost their way after the Lehman Shock. In Japan, this feeling was compounded with the Fukushima nuclear disaster. A survey of 600 Japanese workers revealed a lack of passion that threatens productivity in Japan – and similar findings are likely in other countries as well.
 
The following article excerpts key findings from the survey and discusses methods that corporate leaders can use to increase and sustain passion in their workforce.
 
Survey
PASSION FOR WORK – Some 595 responses to a 2009 internet survey show that the majority of Japanese are not passionate about their job (Graph 1). 

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