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BlueSteps members have exclusive access to the database of the Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants – global recruiting professionals who are placing executives at companies all around the world. However, simply “spamming” these recruiters with your resume is not the way to create connections and build a network.

Always remember that recruiters are not in the business of finding jobs for people. Rather, they are paid to find a small slate of well-qualified candidates for their client companies. They regard themselves as experts at finding the right person through research, outreach, and insider knowledge. They are not “trolling for resumes.”

In career transition, it’s easy to fall into the habit of doing the same things, day after day, even if you’re not getting the results you want. But don’t let your executive job search drive you insane! If you find that your momentum has stalled and you’re not getting the leads, contacts, and interviews you need, follow these suggestions for getting out of your rut and moving forward toward your goals.
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“In business as in life, you don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate,” according to negotiations guru Chester L. Karrass.
 
Whether you are negotiating compensation for a new job, requesting a raise or new responsibilities, or cinching a deal for your current company, you’ll get better results if you master the art and the skill of negotiating.
 
My husband took the Chester Karrass course years ago and I swear he wins every one of our “negotiations!” Perhaps by studying these tips myself I’ll improve my outcome.
 

Whether you call it a resume or a CV, this career document is an essential element in an executive job search and career management strategy. Because BlueSteps members come from all around the world, we at BlueSteps Executive Career Services have become accustomed to answering questions and providing feedback regarding members’ CVs. Here are a few of the most frequently asked questions.

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Being referred to a hiring manager by a trusted person increases an applicant’s odds of being hired 50–100X, according to Lou Adler, author of Performance-Based Hiring.
 
With odds like that, any job seeker would be foolish to ignore the power of networking. In fact, for an effective and efficient search, networking should be your primary strategy.
 
Not all executives believe this, however. I’ve heard lines like these countless times in my many years as a resume writer/career advisor:

When asked how they intend to find their next job, many executives answer, “I’ll contact a headhunter who can manage that for me.” Unfortunately, that statement reflects lack of knowledge about how executive recruiters work and the role an executive search firm plays in the careers of individual executives.
 

To excel at executive interviews, you must have a clear understanding of the purpose, be invested in the process, and give your very best performance in a high-pressure situation. Don’t fall for the myths and preconceptions that have sprung up about this experience. For example:

MYTH #1: Once I get the interview, I’ll be fine. Countless executives have said something like this to me over the years—meaning that they can hold their own in the interview and are only worried about getting the interview in the first place. These executives usually fall into two camps:

1) agile and eloquent speakers who are confident they can talk their way through any situation;

LinkedIn has rapidly grown into the dominant online network for professionals. It’s a venue for you to be found by executive recruiters and potential employers, a great way for you to extend your professional network, and the perfect forum for building your online visibility and showcasing your expertise.
 
It’s essential to make your LinkedIn profile as powerful, professional, and distinctive as possible. If yours is incomplete, weak, or simply a reiteration of your executive resume/CV, use these tips to make sure your profile is helping, not hurting, your career transition:
 
1. Make it personal:
If you’ve struggled to create that all-important profile for LinkedIn, these tips will help.
 
Don’t just paste in your resume/CV.A LinkedIn profile is not a resume. For example, the Summary section on your resume might be a nice concise presentation of your strongest qualifications, but on LinkedIn you have 2000 characters to fill with richer information in a more personal tone. In the Experience sections, you might not want reveal all the company details (numbers, customers, challenges, results, and more) that you include in your resume.
 
Use your resume/CV as the starting point for your LinkedIn profile, and edit and adapt as needed.
 
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