Home

1 (800) 363-1207

Your employment situation can change in a heartbeat — the company may be acquired, or sold, or go out of business. A great boss may leave for a new position — and maybe he wants you to come with him/her. Or maybe his/her replacement wants to bring in his/her own people. Are you ready to jump at a new opportunity in an instant?

Even if you are not actively looking for a new position, your executive resume should be updated and ready to go at a moment’s notice.

Referrals! Recruiters and hiring managers tell us that they will go through their referrals before looking at other candidates. And some companies are highly recommending that executive recruiters look at referred executives first. Industry leaders predict that in three to five years if you are referred to an executive recruiter for an open position, you are 14 times more likely to get the job.

The key to executive interview success is preparation. Interviewing methods differ between companies and people. Are you prepared for a non-traditional interview?

Phone Interview

A phone interview is often one of the first interviews an executive will encounter. Some call this a pre-screen interview when an executive recruiter picks up the phone and calls a candidate – typically to screen them out. This unexpected call can throw some candidates off.

This may seem obvious, but it bears repeating – honesty is the best policy. The executive job search process is difficult enough – you don’t want to get inches away from an offer, only to miss out on the role of a lifetime. Below are some of the factors you should consider when deciding what should and shouldn’t be disclosed to a potential employer.

Executive Job Search - Background ChecksNegative Behavior or Debt Show Up During a Background Check

Much like a blind date, attending a networking event can bring up anxieties. Even the most experienced executive can have some apprehension about walking into an event alone and trying to integrate into groups of people and conversations. Since it is a fact that most jobs are found through networking, it is worth your time to avoid common missteps and hone your networking skills.

Stage One – Introductions

Age discrimination is a reality that can show up during the executive interview process. Through the Internet, this information is visible—a LinkedIn profile picture can reveal your age; a Google search can uncover your age; and filling out a job application can give away your age by the length of your career and date of a college degree.

While the interviewer may be the one asking the questions, you will need to change your approach. Avoid giving the interviewer something to discriminate against. Here are a few examples:

Working abroad has been a dream of many in the American workforce, and executives are no exception. An online survey of more than 200,000 people in 189 countries (published in October 2014) by the Boston Consulting Group, a management consultant, and The Network, a recruitment agency, generated these results: almost two-thirds of the people surveyed (ages 20-50) would contemplate working abroad—and that one in five already had. The surprising statistics were that barely one-third of Americans were willing to work in another country, and of those, 59% were in their 20s.

It’s a fact that salaries haven’t kept pace with inflation. While the economy seems to be recovering from the slump over the past years, employers are still very cautious when it comes to executive salary increases.  When you are ready to ask for a raise, the best position to be in is one of power. Leveraging your resources such as professional accomplishments, personal and professional network, industry expertise, and more could put you in a much better position when negotiating your salary.

Region

The general public is led to believe that companies are trying to become more diversified. But as recent as July 2014, surveys revealed that women and ethnic minorities outnumber white males by two to one in the U.S. work environment, but are still grossly under represented in the executive ranks.

Why do more men get promoted than women? Is it because companies frown on men who promote women? Is it because women executives themselves are reluctant to promote other women because it might reflect negatively on them?

Executive Women ImageRealistically, what can be done about a problem this persistent?

executive_career_coachingProfessional athletes have long known the secret to success is hiring a coach. Take any sport—tennis, football, boxing, even the Olympic athletes—and behind every one of them, especially the high achievers, you will find a coach mentoring and supporting that athlete.
 

Stay Connected