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As an executive career coach, I often encounter entrepreneurs who have left the corporate realm to launch their own business ventures. For a variety of reasons, some want to transition back to a corporate role, but they're unsure of how to go about it.

Driven and innovative business leaders sometimes seek room for experimentation. Entrepreneurship allows them to explore a passion they were unable to focus on working in a demanding role for a corporation. If the venture takes off, they stay, or they eventually sell the business. If it doesn't, they seek employment again.

You’re a busy professional. Maybe you’re already in a C-level position, or perhaps you’re well on your way there. You live and breathe management, it’s your job. Your day-to-day concerns include ensuring that your company is successful and your teams are motivated and inspired. While organizational management and developing others is key to your success, chances are there is more you could be doing to manage your career.

If you’re a leader or rising new talent accelerating in your career, chances are you've been approached by a recruiter. In our era of transparency, and with the rise of LinkedIn and other online professional networks, business leaders are more visible and more accessible than ever. While these platforms can be great for building your network and identifying new business ventures, they can also create confusion when approached by someone you don’t know regarding a new opportunity.

As an executive career consultant of 25 years, I am often asked: “Is this a good resume?” However, it is impossible to answer this frequently asked question without understanding the individual’s career context. An executive resume can be considered “good” for a variety of reasons. What really matters is if it is an effective resume, which is much harder to achieve.

Whenever I do a resume consultation, I always start by asking, “What is your goal?” The answer to that question is what guides how the resume is written. Your resume needs to be aspirational as much as it is historical to achieve its purpose. 

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