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Executives who want to move to a new geographical area sometimes complain that they don’t have any good contacts in the targeted area. They assume, therefore, that they don’t have a strong launch-pad for their job search and post-job-search career progress. 

Whenever you anticipate launching a high-level job or career transition, you undoubtedly hope it will go smoothly. However, only a “Pollyanna-type” personality would blithely assume that such a result will occur every time. You don’t need to be a hard-core pessimist, of course, but being prepared can save you a lot of grief in the long run. 

When was the last time you had your car serviced? Six months…a year…two years? You’ve probably done it more recently than two years, because you want to make sure your car continues to operate reliably and get you where you need to go. Something similar could be said about your career management strategy. You can’t expect it to continue serving you well if you don’t take good care of it and change it when needed.

No one will pat you on the back tomorrow and say, “Good job all these years as our Technology Manager—we’re rewarding you with a promotion to chief executive officer (CEO) of the company!” Most likely, they wouldn’t even offer you the role of chief technology officer.

Why is that?

For at least one, very important reason: You haven’t proven you’re capable of—and ready for—that level of responsibility.

This is not to say that you haven’t put in a lot of time and effort to make your technology-focused function perform effectively and efficiently or that you haven’t paid attention to its importance in supporting corporate objectives.

Know Your Audience

In any communication medium, the #1 rule is: Know your audience! If you know little or nothing about the people who will be receiving your message, you are, in all likelihood, wasting your time by trying to deliver it. What is known as the shotgun approach does not work. At best, it means your unfocused or misdirected message might reach a few of the people you wanted to reach; at worst, it makes you look like a poor communicator.

You didn’t reach the senior management/executive ranks by being lazy. More than likely, you worked quite hard to get where you are today. That said, it might seem strange that I refer to in-person networking and lazy job searching as opposites; but there is a reason.

No, this is not one more entry in the seemingly unending stream of articles that browbeat you for not networking or not doing it as often or as well as you should. However, I do want to share a few thoughts you might not have previously considered about in-person networking and its role in your next job search.

Any job search can contain unexpected hazards—it more or less goes with the territory. However, if you’re a currently-employed executive planning a confidential job search, the potential perils ahead of you give a whole new meaning to the concept of risk.

executive_job_search_confidentialThe view from the executive ranks can be exciting and invigorating; however, at that level even a small misstep might have disastrous consequences. Premature or unplanned communication of your intent to secure a new position is certainly a misstep you want to avoid—and not a small one.

Achieving and maintaining a successful executive career in today’s world requires acknowledging the largely global nature of business. It encompasses not only your home country but many countries and regions worldwide.

It’s hard to imagine that any executive could succeed long term without recognizing this fact. Global business = global outreach and interaction. Even small companies can achieve success on the global stage if they employ the most effective strategies and tools.

So if you’re one of the holdouts who think they either (a) don’t need a robust LinkedIn profile or (b) can’t risk having a strong profile for some reason—I recommend you think again!
 

Someone once said it was great to talk about maintaining work-life balance but you had to create that balance before you could maintain it. The same holds true for career management strategy and your executive career. You need to develop a strategy before you can execute it, and you can’t re-think it if you don’t have one to start with.
 
Interestingly, the concept of work-life balance shows up in Wikipedia’s definition of career management: “The outcome of successful career management should include personal fulfillment, work/life balance, goal achievement and financial security.”

Perhaps the only task harder than reaching a C-level position in the first place is recapturing that rank after you’ve had to step down a rung on the corporate ladder. Yet that’s the dilemma many executives have faced in their careers and usually not by choice.

How did this happen to me?

One or more factors probably play a key part in this situation, including:

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