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In the 2013 BlueSteps Executive Job Trends: Industrial & Manufacturing Report, senior-level executives who work in the industrial & manufacturing sector gave their predictions for 2014. These predictions included the top 5 factors that would influence the sector (cost reduction, human resources, automation, energy efficiency and onshoring), company preparedness for the effects of digital transformation, priority skills for executives working in this sector and their top career concerns.

With a fierce global war for talent on, executive recruiters are actively seeking out passive candidates worldwide for international executive posts. A common assumption being that the best performers are already being successful at work – not actively looking for jobs.

But once an executive is contacted by a recruiter about their interest in pursuing an interesting opportunity overseas, how do they know if the recruiter is really in a position to make things happen?

Here are six questions an executive can ask themselves when evaluating a recruiter proposing an international assignment:
 

The Peter Felix, AESC and BlueSteps President and CEO, recently had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Henry Wang, President of the China Global Talents Society, about current global executive search trends in China and the upcoming China Global Executive Talent Forum.


Peter Felix: Good morning, Henry, it’s a pleasure to talk to you this morning; you’re in Beijing, I’m in New York and look forward to our conversation this morning. Thank you for taking the time to speak with the AESC and BlueSteps about talent management and the shortage of executive talent in China.

The AESC BlueSteps survey of 778 executives was conducted in September 2013 and included responses from CEOs, CFOs, Board Members, Senior VPs, VPs and other management worldwide, including 53 percent from the Americas, 35 percent from EMEA and 12 percent from Asia/Pacific.

“This BlueSteps report highlights the inconsistencies in perception about C-suite executives, in contrast to the high profile cases of robust corner office salaries,” said Peter Felix, President and CEO of AESC. “On the contrary, for most senior executives in our survey salary increases and bonuses have only modestly begun to rise after the financial crisis.”

The AESC and BlueSteps recently had the opportunity to speak with 5 top AESC member executive search consultants, about executive search in Germany. Interviews were conducted with Christine Stimpel, from Heidrick & Struggles, Klaus Hansen, from Odgers Berndtson, Thomas Becker, from Russell Reynolds Associates, Franco Parodi, from Parodi & Associates, and Richard Fudickar, from Boyden. Below is a sample of one of the expert Q&As with Klaus Hansen from Odgers Berndtson.
 

The 2014 AESC’s BlueSteps Executive Compensation survey was conducted from October 2014 to November 2014 and received 907 responses from senior-level executives across the world. The purpose of this survey was to better understand trends in global executive compensation and provide a unique benchmarking resource, providing executive compensation information across a wide range of industries, functional roles and regions.


Total Compensation on the Rise for Most Executives

AESC’s BlueSteps survey of 778 members finds C-suite salaries drop while other management compensation rises; gender gap narrowing in executive suite

By now everyone in the executive search marketplace, whether search firm or candidate, is aware of LinkedIn. With 238 million names it is almost a foregone conclusion that many or most candidates on a short list will have a LinkedIn profile.

Most of Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC) members when commenting on LinkedIn acknowledge that it is a very useful name generation tool. Some of the AESC's largest members even have significant contracts with LinkedIn to provide multi-license facilities to their research staff.

When economic markets collapsed in 2008, the retained executive-search industry slowed dramatically. According to the New York-based Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC) trade group, world-wide industry revenues fell 32% in 2009 and hundreds of consultants left the field.

Today, industry revenues are again approaching their 2007 peak, but executive search itself has undergone changes that are important to both employers and candidates.

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