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Sometimes career change is inevitable. As a culture and economy, we welcome progress, innovation, growth and change as good things. But there is always a price extracted in terms of jobs lost, product obsolescence, industry decline, business consolidations and careers uprooted.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of making the leap to CEO, featuring Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase, and Jose Ruiz, from Alder Koten.

Some of the questions asked included:

When did “how to win friends and influence people” mutate into “how to exclude people and persuade others to join you”? Was it when SCOTUS struck down the Defense of Marriage Act? Or was it on September 11th when people from sixty-two foreign nations were among those who died.

You’ve probably heard this comparison before: A job search is in essence a marketing campaign with you as the product. Your career communications tools are your marketing collateral, and your executive job search strategy equates to your marketing campaign. A smart campaign hones in on specific targets with specific marketing messages built around a specific career brand aligned with specific proof points.
 

Picture this: “Archie is the most incredible storyteller in the world. He was an executive for 30 years. And he has an uncanny ability to turn any topic into something interesting. Seriously, ANY topic. Clay. Golf. CPA scores. When he speaks, it becomes memorable. The man is a business networking dream come true.”

executive_networkingWelcome “back” to the world of networking in-person. Lost art, isn’t it? With the plethora of devices available in the connected world of today, the illusion of being in touch requires a massive overhaul to motivate us to meet people in person. Pray, how does one go about it?

In matters of the heart, logic seldom rules. If you were asked to explain why you loved your spouse or partner, you might be able to list traits and qualities that you admire, but you wouldn’t be able to give a factual, logical explanation of the attraction. You just “clicked.”

In our careers, that “click” is also extremely important. As you consider staying in your current job or making a transition, two points are worth considering.

History is littered with the hulls of rudderless ships because the appropriate captain was not at the helm; and carcasses of executives who have spent lavishly at shareowner expense or inappropriately spoke a word in haste and waste. This year has seen its fair share of jettisoned executives for everything from moral turpitude and fiscal excess or simply being there in the wrong slot. The spectrum of personalities and rationales for the revolving door varies widely. Whether one is able to bounce back often is based on the nature and severity of the departure and whether it was self-inflicted or politically induced.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of personal branding and rebranding, featuring Renee Arrington, from Pearson Partners International, Kimberly Sernel, from BlueSteps Executive Career Services, and John Touey, from Salveson Stetson Group Inc.

Some of the questions asked included:

The number of qualified executive candidates searching for new positions creates a highly competitive job market. Employers are more selective with their executive hires today than ever before.

How can you present yourself to be more hireable and beat your competition? The following four strategies are key.
 

1: Stand out with your resume.

Career gaps are a reality for many of us. Taking time to raise children, care for an ailing relative, manage our own health, study, travel and of course search for a job ... Whatever the reason, the resulting gap can cause challenges during the job search, especially if the time away from work is lengthy.
 
executive_career_managment_career_gapsExecutives often worry about how to address the gap on their resumes and LinkedIn profiles and what to say when networking and interviewing. Here are some strategies for dealing with gaps, with an eye toward minimizing the negative impact and managing any anxiety you may be feeling.

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