Home

1 (800) 363-1207

Building and maintaining relationships with executive search consultants should be a vital component of your career strategy, regardless of whether you are in an active job search or just proactively managing your career next steps.

For executives who are new to the executive search industry, it can be difficult to know where to start, but there are several essential do’s and don’ts that can help you on your way.
 

Remember during your employee orientation when your company reviewed their Code of Ethics with you? You know, the short list of basic ethical guidelines to follow when conducting business on behalf of the corporation? I didn’t think so! 

Most corporations have Codes of Ethics or Ethical Conduct hidden on their websites, or on their internal intranet buried within their “Values” statements, or somewhere within their Employee Handbooks. But, they rarely call attention to them. Corporations figure their new hires and current associates all have a ‘moral compass’ or they would not have been hired in the first place. However, events in today’s business world demonstrate how a simple slip in ethical conduct can doom an entire company.

“We aim to tap the vast talent pool of women professionals who had to leave their professional jobs for their family commitments. We plan to give such women an opportunity to re-start their professional career without disturbing their family priorities,” said the CEO of Bajaj Allianz, the Indian insurance firm, which launched all-women branches two years ago. Cut to the present, and you see offices buzzing with action – selling, processing, transacting – with the sole difference being that these are offices for women, of women, by women.

This message is for the up and comers. The next generation. The about-to-bes. The replacers of the old guard. Yes, this article is for the millennials. Note: Even though the majority of executives come from an earlier generation, most of the advice here could also apply to an executive’s resume.

As a team of executive search consultants, we are constantly using LinkedIn to source candidates. Together with our researchers, we look for specific keywords, commonalities, and direct connections.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of career transition, featuring Rainer Morita, BlueSteps Executive Career Services, and Sally Stetson, Salveson Stetson Group.

Some of the questions asked included:

Whether you are attending a networking event, building a new network, introducing yourself to executive recruiters, or reconnecting with former contacts, timely and effective follow-up is necessary. Networking/keeping in touch may not be your favorite activity; however, it is essential to cultivating relationships for the long haul. And those relationships could be your strongest supporters when looking for a new position.

Don’t drop the ball by forgetting to follow up after connecting with people. Think of networking like a bank account. You have to put something in before you can take something out. The effort you put into your follow up will reap big rewards.

In these contentious times, when almost every topic—even the weather—has become controversial, it is edifying to read about a merger that sailed through the shareholder approval process with near unanimity. On Tuesday, July 19, EMC shareholders voted overwhelmingly and without debate to approve a $62.3 billion merger into Dell, with 98 percent of votes affirming the deal, and almost as many approving golden parachute payments to EMC executives in the event of job loss post-closing. The deal received U.S. and European antitrust approval in February and is on track for approval from Chinese antitrust authorities in time for an October closing. The new company, Dell Technologies, to be chaired and led by Michael Dell, will be privately owned.

While getting ready for an interview, we tend to focus on the tough questions and the appropriate responses to these, rehearsing often in our minds the anecdotes and stories that we should tell. But before you even get the chance to deliver these answers remember, a job interview does not start with the first question. Your interviewer will probably see you before they hear you and if you turn up looking a mess or with a frown on your face, that’s definitely not the start you are hoping for.
 

After six years with a Vietnam government commercial enterprise, returning to the US reflected a lack of professional collegial individuals to interact with. In essence, I had no professional network. As a basis to re-establish a network, many advised that I needed to attend conferences and summits, where I could meet and connect with certain individuals in-person for mutual benefit. While this approach to networking has proven time and time again to be successful, it required time and a great deal of patience, which I simply did not attribute to myself.

Stay Connected