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Jim Collins and his team of researchers spent five years exploring what made companies go from good to great. And through his work, many companies have been positively impacted. But, how do you go from a good leader to a great one?

BlueSteps recently hosted a follow up #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of making the leap to CEO, featuring Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase, and Jose Ruiz, from Alder Koten. To read part one, click here.

Some of the questions asked included:

You didn’t reach the senior management/executive ranks by being lazy. More than likely, you worked quite hard to get where you are today. That said, it might seem strange that I refer to in-person networking and lazy job searching as opposites; but there is a reason.

No, this is not one more entry in the seemingly unending stream of articles that browbeat you for not networking or not doing it as often or as well as you should. However, I do want to share a few thoughts you might not have previously considered about in-person networking and its role in your next job search.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of networking with executive recruiters, featuring Lucie Shaw, Amrop UK, and Chris Swan, TRANSEARCH.

Some of the questions asked included:

As companies become more global, international careers increase. Now is an excellent time for those who want to take advantage of these international opportunities – and the following guidelines will help.
 
IDENTIFYING THE OPPORTUNITIES

First, Know Thyself
Knowing who you are is the first step in understanding your international career choices. The answer to your next best job lies within you. Your vision and dreams, career passion and purpose, values and beliefs, strengths and weaknesses, determine your performance today and in the future.
 
Second, Know What You Want

In the decades of boom economic times, many executives never had to look for a job while climbing and advancing in their career - most executives were promoted up the corporate ladder in their company, recruited by search consultants, or solicited by direct contacts in other companies for employment. Opportunities were plentiful and talent was less so.

The game has changed and it most likely will not return to the above scenario in the near future. This new search environment has found many executives unawares of how to approach, manage and make the best use of their 'first call' networking circle. This is the group closest to you that you call first for help, and they will give you just about anything professionally.

The executive interview is often a challenging experience. We recently shared our guidelines to help you prepare for your interview in our post “The Best Ways to Prepare for an Executive Interview”. The interview process is often one where search consultants analyze your experience, skills, competences, and potential fit with the company. The process is often less of a two-way conversation and more of a Q&A session with the search consultants directing the questions at you. But, there are some vital questions that you should be prepared to ask and discuss during the interview process.

You've built yourself a long career history after many years of hard work, and your resume/CV is packed full of your extensive experience. But if you haven’t been on the job hunt for a while, you might be out of touch with today’s resume/CV trends, and you might be worried about how all of those years of experience will be perceived by prospective employers.
 
Most importantly, you want to know how you can show your future employer that age isn't a factor—that you are on top of your industry and up-to-date in current technology.
 

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of board directors, featuring Keith Pearson, from Pearson Partners International, and Jose Ruiz, from Alder Koten.

Some of the questions asked included:

He drives a Tesla. She drives a Leaf. His is leased, hers was bought outright. He wanted to drive in the carpool lane (without the extra passenger). She wanted to contribute to cleaner air. He got the top-speed model to go zero to 60 in under three seconds. Hers can barely make it in ten.

Yet, she dry cleans her jeans, colors her hair with peroxide-based dye, and orders take-out food three times a week. He loves to cook every night with organic ingredients, drops his clothes off at a fluff-and-fold that uses earth-friendly detergent, and charges his car with a solar-panel system.
 

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