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When discussing cultural differences, we tend to think in terms of national culture. Culture, however, goes beyond nationality and is referred to as “the pattern of beliefs, behaviors, and values maintained by groups of interacting people.” (Milton J. Bennett, Ph.D). This implies that there are several types of culture: regional, gender, religion, professional, corporate and generational.

This is an excerpt of BlueSteps' guide Your Executive Guide to Joining a Board of Directors.

While executives know board positions are great professional opportunities, many still shy away from adding one to their career plan because they find the strenuous selection process daunting or worry about the time commitment of serving on a board. These are fair considerations, but the challenges are well outweighed by the experiences and professional growth it can provide. As you decide whether a board role is right for you, consider the following benefits serving on a Board of Directors will give you.

1. Expand Your Network

Did you ever think to yourself… “Been in my industry what seems a life time, too many years in my current position, I’ve been there, I’ve done that?”

Or have you suddenly and unexpectedly found yourself between jobs? Perhaps fired, cut from the payroll but still a family to take care of? Or at best, you called it quits yourself?

If it’s been longer than 5 years since you’ve dipped your toes in the job search waters, it’s important to understand that some key components of the job hunt have changed. As an Executive Resume Writer, I can attest that there’s more to it than refreshing your resume (even if you have your resume professionally written), making sure your LinkedIn is current (although that’s certainly an important part of it), and scouring online job boards.

In fact, spending most of your time applying online can land you in the ATS (applicant tracking system) black hole— from which many resumes never return. Not only will you walk away incredibly frustrated, it will likely prolong your job search.

It’s often said that when it comes to knowing about technology, there are just two different types of HRD: those that know their stuff, and those that do not.

Is your 2019 New Year’s Resolution to find a new and challenging executive role? If so, you will need to make sure your search strategy is effective, your resume meets best practices, and your LinkedIn presence conveys the appropriate message to your intended community.

Often, resumes will try to cover too many job targets on one document. It confuses recruiters who will quickly lose their interest. If you don’t write to a specific target audience, your resume won’t connect recruiters to the job they are trying to fill. A modern resume is a well-branded resume. The first and most important step is to define your brand and key differentiators.

Is it time to pivot out of the functional area or industry you’ve been working within?

There is no doubt that expanding your horizons in terms of functional expertise or industry can amplify your career prospects and make you a more attractive hire for the broader perspective you’ll bring. But getting over the first hurdle of convincing a recruiter to consider you can be challenging.

It’s no surprise—it can even be challenging to develop a compelling career story when you are not making a major transition. Throw in the need to completely reposition yourself, and the task can quickly become overwhelming.

Here are a few tips to consider as you craft your career documents to reposition yourself for a new area or sector.

Making connections within the executive search community can dramatically increase your professional options and skyrocket your career trajectory. But understanding the intricacies of executive networking can be a stumbling block for many executives.

If connecting with recruiters is your New Year’s Resolution, here are our top tips on how to put your best foot forward to make valuable, long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationships.

 

1. Build Your Network Before You Need It

There’s a question you haven’t asked yourself yet as you look ahead to the New Year. You may have asked yourself, “What could go better this year than last year?” but Kevin Sealey, VP of Operations, EPOCH Student Living, believes there’s another important question you may be forgetting to ask:

"What were your greatest successes? Did you ever take time to understand why they were a success and the work that lead to it being successful? Take these positive experiences and incorporate them into your plan for 2019.”

This is an excerpt of AESC's report Leading Transformation: Shaping the C-Suite for Business. In the excerpt, AESC member executive recruiters how they believe the C-level leaders will need to evolve to compete in Business 4.0.

CMOs Must Evangelize Customer Centricity and Acrossthe Enterprise

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