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You wouldn’t embark on a cross-country road trip without the tools you need to reach your destination, would you? Maybe some maps, but definitely a good GPS system these days. While not infallible, GPS is nearly always helpful.

The same holds true for the tools you need to use in your high-level job search—loosely defined as VP and above. They must be as strong as possible, and you need to use them as wisely and effectively as possible. Like a GPS, though, they might not be perfect.

Which brings us to LinkedIn as a tool for your job search.

Being a leader is hard. If you struggle in a position where you’re affecting change, making decisions, and managing employees, learn from those who are already doing it well. Instead of harping on yourself, or running away from a great position, use these executive leadership ideas to get better.

With each task you delegate, every employee you empower, and each moment of self-reflection, you’ll find yourself becoming the leader you always knew you could be.

 

Hone Your Emotional Intelligence

One of the most difficult challenges faced by job seekers during a sustained job search is maintaining the motivation to commit time and effort to the search. One of the best ways to reignite your job search can be to re-strategize and critically assess which activities are yielding results and which activities can be retired.

If your job search is in need of a boost, see below for our top tips on activities that can propel your efforts to the next level:

 

As a career consultant, I have been fortunate enough to get an opportunity to work with clients across career stages right from the level of entry and junior professionals all the way up to senior roles and CXOs. And over the years, certain patterns become obvious regardless of the career stage the professional is at.

Recently, during an evening with friends at the local club, the topic of compensation negotiation emerged as a dominant theme amidst discussions on various topics. It got me thinking and based on an analysis of various pieces of advice doled out by others over the years, and my own research, here’s a dossier on this important aspect of our corporate lives:

Ask! Are you aware that barely one-third of candidates even negotiate? And less than half of internal candidates talk about raises during annual appraisals? While people may have their own inhibitions for not doing so, it’s important to remember the old adage that you miss 100% of the shots you do not take!

I’ve been fortunate to interview many successful career professionals as an executive resume writer throughout my career, and have had the opportunity to pick their brains about what worked (and what didn’t!) during their job searches. Common themes have emerged. Here’s a list of 4 things most would do differently if turning back time was an option. These tips will help you conduct a successful job search online and offline to get hired faster.

How to Conduct a Successful Job Search:

 

1. Figure Out What Roles You Want to Target

With unemployment at record lows, combined with baby boomers retiring at an all-time high, companies are competing for the best talent, especially at the executive level. Today’s hiring process indicates companies are relying on artificial intelligence and algorithms as part of the mix to choose the next hire.

Trends:

It is no secret that executives have hectic schedules and are often left with little or no time to allocate for social networking, both online or in person. But could a half-hearted approach to LinkedIn actually be harming your reputation, your brand, your organization and your future?

Here’s four reasons why it might be time to reprioritize and find time for LinkedIn:

 

An ideal interview is like a tennis match: Interviewer serves. He speaks. Candidate returns. She speaks. Both exhibit poise, talent and knowledge of the game. Both sides learn. Both earn benefits that are independent of the outcome.

A successful interview fosters meaningful, productive conversation for both parties. It may yield a job offer, ideal for everyone involved, but it’s unlikely to reach that point unless the meeting flows well.

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