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Most people have never been taught how to conduct an executive job search, unless they have had the insight to work with an executive career coach. Research shows that the average executive spends 4 years in a job — and has as many as 12-15 jobs over the course of a career.
 
You may thrive on variety and change in your career. But no one likes to linger in the “unknown’ too long when making a transition to a new job or career direction. Here are some tips to help you work towards finding a new executive job faster.

Leading video conference tools (SKYPE, GoToMeeting and others) are becoming ubiquitous tools for recruiting.  You can make video and audio calls, exchange chat messages (using Skype’s software) on your computer and/or mobile device just over the internet. Many of the services are even available for free, or you can of course pay for added features. All of these tools use your computer’s webcam or an external web cam for quick video calls.

More and more companies have begun using these tools recently. The do's and don’ts list for a video interview is different from both in-person and phone interviews. Here’s a good start if you are prepping for a video interview.

The following is an excerpt from BlueSteps' webinar Executive Interviews: Preparation Performing and Following Up. If you are a BlueSteps member, access your full recording here. If you are interested in becoming a BlueSteps to access our webinar archive, along with other career management solutions, learn more here.

 

What constitutes good management? How do you nurture employees in such a way as to ensure that they contribute maximum value for the company? One thing is certain: More often than not, appearances and reality are worlds apart. A study discovered that managers rate their own style far more highly than specialists perceive. Angela Westdorf, Managing Partner at Signium Germany, shares her views on how bosses can solve the dilemma and why a directive management style is outdated.

Maintaining existing relationships is as important as building new ones. It is easy to prioritize exciting new contacts made within your target industries or organizations over long-term relationships that have always been there. However, the contacts that will help you the most, especially during an executive job search, are those that you nurture and maintain.

AESC, the parent organization of BlueSteps recently released it's latest report Executive Talent 2025. It includes insights from 2,000+ business leaders, candidates, and executive talent advisors on key business challenges for today and the next five years. Learn about the most critical issues revealed by business leaders to strengthen your talent strategy and gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. Below is a summary of its main findings


"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." Thomas Edison

At the pace that technology and the global economy is moving, it is no wonder that we all have trouble keeping up. It may not be dressed in overalls but it is absolutely hard work. In the last 5-8 years, the way a job search is conducted has altered markedly, and professionals must continue to stay abreast of new styles, techniques and methodologies employed in a career transition. In some ways, our careers are now always “on” due to the Technology 4.0.

As an Executive Resume Writer, I frequently have clients tell me they don’t want to limit themselves. Therefore, they ask for a resume that can be used for a variety of roles; they are looking for a way to transform their resume. Unfortunately, generic resumes often are quite diluted. Therefore, the reader is hard-pressed to determine how you are a good fit for a specific role.

It is great to be a jack-of-all-trades – but it is rare that a job posting calls for someone with these skills. Customizing your resume in a few key areas requires a bit of work. However, it will guide the reader to see how your skills align with a job posting.

Ashton Ward, managing partner of AESC member firm Eton Bridge Partners, believes that culture within a business is the key to success.

Directing the strategy and satisfying shareholders are essential responsibilities of any CEO, however in my experience the culture, driven by the right values and behaviors should be at the top of the list.

“Clients do not come first. Employees come first. Look after your employees and they will look after your clients.” Richard Branson.

Change cultures through changing behaviors

During the workweek, we may spend more time with our colleagues than we do our families. That’s a lot of time! Why not enjoy it? We know that our work life is a direct contributor to our overall happiness. What we might not realize is just how important our relationships are at work. Not just professional relationships but real, meaningful relationships built on support and trust.

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