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A friend of mine reached out recently, asking for advice on how best to write her resume. I then delved into my dossier, containing a compendium on do’s and don’ts handed out over the years, and figured out at one glance that my advice is a departure from the standard by-the-book norm – instead, it shares tips from the point of view of the reviewer, who has barely 60 seconds to flick through your “autobiography” and form an impression of you! 

Whether you know it or not, you already have a personal brand. Everything you do, write or say, changes the perspectives of those around you, and in the age of the Internet and Social Media, you are already on a public stage.

Take control of how you are perceived and use your brand to boost your career and attract new opportunities. By proactively and intentionally managing your personal brand you can shape your own reputation, showcase your knowledge and increase your visibility in the job market. Ready to start crafting your executive image? Here are our 8 top tips to build that unbeatable brand:

If you’re like me, you can’t help feeling like the coming of the fall season is a new beginning. Those many years of school conditioned me to have that association. It’s a time for refocusing on our goals and to determine where we want to be before the year’s end.  Perhaps you’ve enjoyed some summer vacation time, which has allowed you to slow down and reflect on the bigger picture of your career.

For many executives, it is a time to examine their career trajectory and take necessary steps to keep the momentum going, such as refreshing an outdated resume and beginning to explore “what’s out there”.

Depending on how long it has been, you may need more than a mere resume update. Ask yourself:

 

If you are good at your job, you may find yourself being tasked with additional work such as implementing new initiatives or working with high profile clients. It is a common trend – those who do good work get more work. This can leave high-performing and trusted employees feeling overwhelmed and stressed.

Funny enough, the top result of a Google search on “being good at your job” is an article about the danger of being good at your job. A 2015 Duke University study found that having high self-control (an indicator of success) might have negative interpersonal costs, leading individuals to become burdened by others’ reliance.

Let me present yourself one of the deadliest and yet often most easily neglected mistake you can do as executive in career transition: Having a big EGO. Let me show you three examples and the negative consequences of a big ego for job search success.

 

Mistake Number 1: “I can do it.”

Your resume tells who you are. Simply put, you are what you write, and not what you think you are. An executive maybe a worldwide SVP of Sales, but the resume presents you as a middle manager. You may be an industry-agnostic General Manager, but your resume makes you an automotive industry expert. You may rank high in an investment bank, but you fail to communicate your responsibility and 100 staff under you.

As CEO of AESC, I come face-to-face with business leaders around the world on a regular basis. C-suite leaders regularly share with me common challenges in their industries and organizations, from a lack of diversity to the struggle to innovate in an increasingly complex and ever-shifting business environment. As a result, I recently discussed those top challenges of today.

Serving on a non-profit board is a full body exercise in governance. Board members contribute far more than just their votes. They fill a vital leadership role that engages both their subject matter expertise and their leadership skills.

A board member’s role is to advance their organization’s mission and vision. They do so by understanding and championing the needs and values of all stakeholders who interplay with the organization. To serve their institution well, board members must be good listeners, versatile professionals and big picture thinkers.

In our current international business environment, most executives have colleagues and clients across the globe, which means the days of limiting your networking to local business events is a thing of the past. To build and maintain your professional network, it’s important to take a strategic virtual approach.

As an executive, you know that having a captivating LinkedIn profile and continually building and staying active with your LinkedIn connections are vital aspects of virtual networking. But there is more to virtual networking then just maintaining your LinkedIn profile.

You’ve probably noticed LinkedIn is in continuous flux, with tweaks to the interface and new features rolling out fairly regularly – often with little to no warning. To make thing even more complex, rollouts occur in waves so one user might have a new feature while the other is left waiting. For job seekers and for those who value protecting their professional brand, there are four new features I recommend becoming familiar with that by now should appear on the desktops of all users:

 

1. New Setting Protects Your Profile from Plagiarism

This is an excerpt of "Technologies on the C-Suite Horizon," from AESC Executive Talent Magazine

Digital tools and disruptive technologies from artificial intelligence and machine learning to 3D printing, 5G, IoT, Robotic Process Automation, virtual and augmented reality are transforming communication, banking, HR, manufacturing, finance, medicine, agriculture and more. What are some of the latest tools and technologies? How will organizations harness cutting-edge developments for competitive advantage? And what are the qualities of the leader who cannot only guide organizations through this disruption, but also the disruptions no one has imagined, yet?

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